CPHI [CHINA PHARMA] 10-Q:

Ticker: CPHI, Company: CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC., Type: 10-Q, Date: 2019-05-14, XBRL Interactive Financials
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Webplus: CPHI/20190514/10-Q/1/000.htm SEC Original: f10q0319_chinapharma.htm



s:123959:" 10-Q 1 f10q0319_chinapharma.htm QUARTERLY REPORT

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check One):

Large accelerated filer ☐ Accelerated filer ☐

Non-accelerated filer ☒

Smaller reporting company ☒

Emerging growth company ☐

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No ☒

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock CPHI NYSE American

APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE ISSUERS:

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 43,579,557 shares of Common Stock, $0.001 par value, were outstanding as of May 9, 2019.

CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
PART I FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements 1
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 (Unaudited) 3
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited) 4
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited) 5
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited) 6
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) 7
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 17
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 25
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 25
PART II OTHER INFORMATION
Item 6. Exhibits 26

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets, unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss), statements of stockholders’ equity and statements of cash flows and the related notes thereto, have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information and in conjunction with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Accordingly, they do not include all of the disclosures required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. The financial statements reflect all adjustments, consisting only of normal, recurring adjustments, which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair presentation for the interim periods.

The accompanying financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

The results of operations for the three-month period ended March 31, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the entire fiscal year or any other period.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 (Unaudited) 3
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited) 4
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited) 5
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited) 6
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) 7

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

March 31, December 31,
2019 2018
ASSETS
Current Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents $ 961,277 $ 1,186,587
Restricted cash 976,622 1,273,940
Banker’s acceptances 51,424 20,579
Trade accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $18,295,892 and $17,815,075, respectively 845,401 916,931
Other receivables, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $7,187 and $34,884, respectively 225,010 170,098
Advances to suppliers 108,454 47
Inventory 4,934,248 5,054,975
Prepaid expenses 118,701 123,759
Total Current Assets 8,221,137 8,746,916
Advances for purchases of intangible assets 17,490,101 17,069,587
Property and equipment, net 19,067,032 19,294,379
Operating lease right of use asset 212,587 -
Intangible assets, net 250,266 266,443
TOTAL ASSETS $ 45,241,123 $ 45,377,325
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current Liabilities:
Trade accounts payable $ 1,093,182 $ 1,060,934
Accrued expenses 117,241 310,804
Other payables 2,838,847 3,065,508
Advances from customers 526,247 525,647
Other payables - related parties 1,518,756 1,633,263
Operating lease liability, current portion 91,597 -
Current portion of construction loan facility 2,086,092 2,181,360
Bankers’ acceptance notes payable 976,622 1,273,940
Total Current Liabilities 9,248,584 10,051,456
Non-current Liabilities:
Construction loan facility 4,470,197 4,362,720
Operating lease liability, net of current portion 122,229 -
Deferred tax liability 783,204 764,374
Total Liabilities 14,624,214 15,178,550
Stockholders’ Equity:
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued or outstanding - -
Common stock, $0.001 par value; 95,000,000 shares authorized; 43,579,557 shares and 43,579,557 shares outstanding, respectively 43,580 43,580
Additional paid-in capital 23,590,204 23,590,204
Accumulated deficit (5,688,089 ) (5,270,358 )
Accumulated other comprehensive income 12,671,214 11,835,349
Total Stockholders’ Equity 30,616,909 30,198,775
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY $ 45,241,123 $ 45,377,325

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(Unaudited)

For the Three Months
Ended March 31,
2019 2018
Revenue $ 2,929,273 $ 3,615,684
Cost of revenue 2,272,743 2,561,984
Gross profit 656,530 1,053,700
Operating expenses:
Selling expenses 478,691 678,330
General and administrative expenses 428,817 492,010
Research and development expenses 69,918 22,213
Bad debt expense 13,312 1,834
Total operating expenses 990,738 1,194,387
Loss from operations (334,208 ) (140,687 )
Other income (expense):
Interest income 3,257 2,294
Interest expense (86,780 ) (129,102 )
Net other expense (83,523 ) (126,808 )
Loss before income taxes (417,731 ) (267,495 )
Income tax expense - (25,985 )
Net loss (417,731 ) (293,480 )
Other comprehensive income - foreign currency translation adjustment 835,865 1,674,076
Comprehensive income (loss) $ 418,134 $ 1,380,596
Loss per share:
Basic and diluted $ (0.01 ) $ (0.01 )
Weighted average shares outstanding 43,579,557 43,579,557

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(Unaudited)

Accumulated
Additional Other Total
Common Stock Paid-in Retained Comprehensive Stockholders’
Shares Amount Capital Earnings Income Equity
Balance, January 1, 2018 43,579,557 43,580 23,590,204 5,479,809 13,957,709 43,071,302
Net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2018 (293,480 ) (293,480 )
Foreign currency translation adjustment 1,674,076 1,674,076
Balance, March 31, 2018 43,579,557 43,580 23,590,204 5,186,329 15,631,785 44,451,898

Accumulated
Additional Other Total
Common Stock Paid-in Accumulated Comprehensive Stockholders’
Shares Amount Capital Deficit Income Equity
Balance, January 1, 2019 43,579,557 43,580 23,590,204 (5,270,358 ) 11,835,349 30,198,775
Net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2019 (417,731 ) (417,731 )
Foreign currency translation adjustment 835,865 835,865
Balance, March 31, 2019 43,579,557 43,580 23,590,204 (5,688,089 ) 12,671,214 30,616,909

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

For the Three Months
Ended March 31,
2019 2018
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:
Net loss $ (417,731 ) $ (293,480 )
Depreciation and amortization 795,483 861,430
Bad debt expense 13,312 1,834
Deferred income taxes - 25,985
Non cash lease expense 1,233 -
Changes in assets and liabilities:
Trade accounts and other receivables (145,935 ) (266,479 )
Advances to suppliers (107,839 ) (237,165 )
Inventory 389,589 427,741
Trade accounts payable 6,079 196,434
Accrued taxes payable (51,879 ) (163,335 )
Other payables and accrued expenses (387,569 ) (52,823 )
Advances from customers (12,285 ) 20,709
Prepaid expenses 8,065 2,888
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities 90,523 523,739
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:
Purchases of property and equipment (73,866 ) (3,627 )
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities (73,866 ) (3,627 )
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:
Payments of construction term loan (148,227 ) (157,316 )
Payments of related party payables (119,561 ) -
Net Cash Used in Financing Activities (267,788 ) (157,316 )
Effect of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash 25,821 75,025
Net (Decrease) Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents (225,310 ) 437,821
Cash and Cash Equivalents at Beginning of Period 1,186,587 2,030,214
Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Period $ 961,277 $ 2,468,035
Supplemental Cash Flow Information:
Cash paid for income taxes $ - $ -
Cash paid for interest $ 80,693 $ 125,716
Supplemental Noncash Investing and Financing Activities:
Issuance of banker’s acceptances $ 55,603 $ 443,748
Accounts receivable collected with banker’s acceptances 175,793 133,053
Inventory purchased with banker’s acceptances 145,614 148,924
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for operating lease obligations 236,055 -

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Organization and Nature of Operations –China Pharma Holdings, Inc., a Nevada corporation, owns 100% of Onny Investment Limited (“Onny”), a British Virgin Islands corporation, which owns 100% of Hainan Helpson Medical & Biotechnology Co., Ltd (“Helpson”), a company organized under the laws of the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”). China Pharma Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries are referred to herein as the Company.

On December 31, 2012, China Pharma Holdings, Inc. consummated a reincorporation merger for the purpose of changing its state of incorporation from Delaware to Nevada, pursuant to the terms and conditions of an Agreement and Plan of Merger dated December 27, 2012.  The reincorporation merger was approved by stockholders holding the majority of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock on December 21, 2012.

 The Foreign Investment Industrial Catalogue(the “Catalogue”) jointly issued by China’s Ministry of Commerce and the National Development and Reform Commission (the latest version is the 2012 version, effective January 30, 2012) classified various industries/businesses into three different categories: (i) encouraged for foreign investment; (ii) restricted to foreign investment; and (iii) prohibited from foreign investment. For any industry/business not covered by any of these three categories, they will be deemed industries/businesses permitted for foreign investment. A typical foreign investment restriction in the pharmaceutical industry is that a foreign investment enterprise (the “FIE”) shall not have the whole or majority of its equity interests held by a foreign owner if the FIE establishes more than 30 branch stores and distributes a variety of brands in those franchise stores. However, the Company’s business is not subject to this restriction.

Helpson manufactures and markets generic and branded pharmaceutical products as well as biochemical products primarily to hospitals and private retailers located throughout the PRC. The Company believes Helpson’s business is not subject to any ownership restrictions prescribed under the Catalogue. Onny acquired 100% of the ownership in Helpson on May 25, 2005, by entering into an Equity Transfer Agreement with Helpson’s three former shareholders. The transaction was approved by the Commercial Bureau of Hainan Province on June 12, 2005 and Helpson received the Certificate of Approval for Establishment of Enterprises with Foreign Investment in the PRC on the same day. Helpson received its business license evidencing its Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise (WFOE) status on June 21, 2005.

The Company has acquired and continues to acquire well-accepted medical formulas to add to its diverse portfolio of Western and Chinese medicines.

Consolidation and Basis of Presentation– The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and are expressed in United States dollars. The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts and operations of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in the consolidation.

Helpson’s functional currency is the Chinese Renminbi. Helpson’s revenue and expenses are translated into United States dollars at the average exchange rate for the period. Assets and liabilities are translated at the exchange rate as of the end of the reporting period. Gains or losses from translating Helpson’s financial statements are included in accumulated other comprehensive income, which is a component of stockholders’ equity. Gains and losses arising from transactions denominated in a currency other than the functional currency of the entity that is party to the transaction are included in the results of operations.

Accounting Estimates-The methodology used to prepare the Company’s financial statements is in conformity with the accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, which requires the management of the Company (“Management”) to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Therefore, actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and Cash Equivalents– Cash and cash equivalents include interest bearing and non-interest bearing bank deposits, money market accounts, and short-term banker’s acceptances notes purchased with maturities of three months or less.

Restricted CashRestricted cash includes cash that has been deposited with a bank to satisfy outstanding obligations under banker’s acceptance notes issued by the Company as discussed in Note 7.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

Trade Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts –Trade accounts receivables are carried at the original invoiced amounts less an allowance for doubtful accounts. The allowances for doubtful accounts are calculated based on a detailed review of certain individual customer accounts and an estimation of the overall economic conditions affecting the Company’s customer base. The Company reviews a customer’s credit history before extending credit to the customer. If the financial condition of its customers were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, additions to the allowance would be required. A provision is made against accounts receivable to the extent they are considered unlikely to be collected. Charges to bad debt expense totaled $13,312 and $1,834 for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Trade accounts receivable that have been fully allowed for and determined to be uncollectible are charged against the allowance in the period the determination is made. The Company charged off uncollectible trade accounts receivable balances in the amount of $0 against the allowance for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. It is common practice in the PRC for receivables to extend beyond one year. Customer balances outstanding for more than one year are allowed for at a greater rate when calculating the allowance for doubtful accounts.

Advances to Suppliers and Advances from Customers – Common practice in the PRC is to make advances to suppliers for materials and to receive advances from customers for finished products. Advances to suppliers are applied to trade accounts payable when the materials are received. Advances received from customers are applied against trade accounts receivable when finished products are sold. The Company reviews a supplier’s credit history and background information before advancing a payment. If the financial condition of its suppliers were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to deliver goods or provide services, the Company would recognize bad debt expenses in the period they are considered unlikely to be collected.

Inventory –Inventory consists of raw materials, work in process and finished goods and is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using a weighted average. For work in process and manufactured inventories, cost consists of raw materials, direct labor and an allocated portion of the Company’s production overhead. The Company writes down excess and obsolete inventory to its estimated net realizable value based upon assumptions about future demand and market conditions. For finished goods and work in process, if the estimated net realizable value for an inventory item, which is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predicable costs to completion and disposal, is lower than its cost, the specific inventory item is written down to its estimated net realizable value. Net realizable value for raw materials is based on replacement cost. Provisions for inventory write-downs are included in the cost of revenues in the consolidated statements of operations. Inventories are carried at this lower cost basis until sold or scrapped.

Valuation of Long-Lived Assets – The carrying values of long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying values may not be recoverable. When such an event occurs, the Company projects the undiscounted cash flows to be generated from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition over the remaining life of the asset. If projections indicate that the carrying value of an asset will not be recovered, it is reduced by the estimated excess of the carrying value over the projected discounted cash flows estimated to be generated by the asset. If there is uncertainty both in the aforementioned timing and amount, the Company will use the projected discounted cash flows to be generated by the asset.  There was no impairment loss recognized for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018.

Property and Equipment – Property and equipment are stated at cost. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expenses as incurred and major improvements are capitalized. Gains or losses on sale, trade-in or retirement are included in operations during the period of disposition. Depreciation relating to office equipment was included in general and administrative expenses, while all other depreciation was included in cost of revenue.

Revenue Recognition – Revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services and is recognized in an amount that reflects the consideration that an entity expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. In addition, the standard requires disclosure of the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. The amount of revenue that is recorded reflects the consideration that the Company expects to receive in exchange for those goods. The Company applies the following five-step model in order to determine this amount: (i) identification of the promised goods in the contract; (ii) determination of whether the promised goods are performance obligations, including whether they are distinct in the context of the contract; (iii) measurement of the transaction price, including the constraint on variable consideration; (iv) allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations; and (v) recognition of revenue when (or as) the Company satisfies each performance obligation.

The Company only applies the five-step model to contracts when it is probable that the entity will collect the consideration it is entitled to in exchange for the goods or services it transfers to the customer. Once a contract is determined to be within the scope of ASC 606 at contract inception, the Company reviews the contract to determine which performance obligations the Company must deliver and which of these performance obligations are distinct. The Company recognizes as revenues the amount of the transaction price that is allocated to the respective performance obligation when the performance obligation is satisfied or as it is satisfied. Generally, the Company’s performance obligations are transferred to customers at a point in time, typically upon buyer’s designated carrier or the buyer picks up the goods at our warehouse.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

For all reporting periods, the Company has not disclosed the value of unsatisfied performance obligations for all product revenue contracts with an original expected length of one year or less, which is an optional exemption that is permitted under the adoption rules.

Cost of Revenues – Cost of revenues includes wages, materials, depreciation, handling charges, and other expenses associated with the manufacture and delivery of products.

Research and Development – Research and development expenditures are recorded as expenses in the period in which they occur.

Basic and Diluted Loss per Common Share-Basic loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted loss per share is calculated to give effect to potentially issuable dilutive common shares.

There were no potentially dilutive common shares outstanding during the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Credit Risk – The carrying amount of accounts receivable included in the balance sheet represents the Company’s exposure to credit risk in relation to its financial assets. No other financial asset carries a significant exposure to credit risk. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of each customer’s financial condition. The Company maintains allowances for doubtful accounts and such allowances in the aggregate have not exceeded Management’s estimates.

The Company has its cash in bank deposits primarily at state owned banks located in the PRC. Historically, deposits in PRC banks have been secured due to the state policy of protecting depositors’ interests. The PRC promulgated a new Bankruptcy Law in August 2006, effective June 1, 2007, which contains provisions for the implementation of measures for the bankruptcy of PRC banks. In the event that bankruptcy laws are enacted for banks in the PRC, the Company’s deposits may be at a higher risk of loss.

Interest Rate Risk – The Company is exposed to the risk arising from changing interest rates, which may affect the ability of repayment of existing debts and the viability of securing future debt instruments within the PRC.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recently Implemented Pronouncements

In February 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-02,Leases, a new standard on accounting for leases. Effective January 1, 2019, we adopted this standard. The ASU introduces a right-of-use (“ROU”) model that requires a lessee to record an ROU asset and lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than twelve months, as well as disclose key information regarding leasing arrangements. Adoption of this standard resulted in the recognition of right-of-use assets of $236,055 and related lease obligations of $236,055 as of January 1, 2019. The adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s operating results or cash flows.

As permitted by the transition guidance, the Company adopted this standard by applying the modified retrospective method without the restatement of comparative periods. The Company elected the package of practical expedients, which permits a lessee to not reassess under the new standard its prior conclusions regarding lease identification, lease classification and initial direct costs. The Company did not elect the practical expedient which permits the use of hindsight when determining the lease term and assessing right-of-use assets for impairment. As permitted by the transition guidance, the Company used the remaining lease term as of the date of adoption of the standard to estimate discount rates. As permitted by this standard, the Company elected, for all asset classes, the short-term lease exemption. A short-term lease is a lease that, at the commencement date, has a term of twelve months or less and does not include an option to purchase the underlying asset. See Note 9 for additional information on our leases.

Accounting Policy for Leases –The Company determines if an arrangement contains a lease at inception. The Company elected the practical expedient, for all asset classes, to account for each lease component of a contract and its associated non-lease components as a single lease component, rather than allocating a standalone value to each component of a lease. For purposes of calculating operating lease obligations under the standard, the Company’s lease terms may include options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise such option. The Company’s leases do not contain material residual value guarantees or material restrictive covenants. Operating lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease terms.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

The discount rate used to measure a lease obligation is usually the rate implicit in the lease; however, the Company’s operating leases generally do not provide an implicit rate. Accordingly, the Company uses its incremental borrowing rate at lease commencement to determine the present value of lease payments. The incremental borrowing rate is an entity-specific rate which represents the rate of interest a lessee would pay to borrow on a collateralized basis over a similar term with similar payments.

Recently Issued Pronouncements

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13,Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326), which introduces new guidance for the accounting for credit losses on instruments within its scope. The new guidance introduces an approach based on expected losses to estimate credit losses on certain types of financial instruments. It also modifies the impairment model for available-for-sale (AFS) debt securities and provides for a simplified accounting model for purchased financial assets with credit deterioration since their origination. The pronouncement will be effective for public business entities that are SEC filers in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early application of the guidance will be permitted for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the pending adoption of the new standard on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

From time to time, the FASB or other standards setting bodies issue new accounting pronouncements. Updates to the FASB ASCs are communicated through issuance of ASUs. Unless otherwise discussed, the Company believes that the recently issued guidance, whether adopted or to be adopted in the future, is not expected to have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements upon adoption.

NOTE 2 – INVENTORY

Inventory consisted of the following:

March 31, December 31,
2019 2018
Raw materials $ 3,096,752 $ 3,148,990
Work in process 434,286 493,768
Finished goods 1,403,210 1,412,217
Total Inventory 4,934,248 5,054,975

NOTE 3 – PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Property, plant and equipment consisted of the following:

March 31, December 31,
2019 2018
Permit of land use $ 419,703 $ 409,612
Building 9,746,159 9,511,832
Plant, machinery and equipment 27,305,129 26,576,409
Motor vehicle 320,513 312,807
Office equipment 203,428 198,292
Total 37,994,932 37,008,952
Less: accumulated depreciation (18,927,900 ) (17,714,573 )
Property, Plant and Equipment, net $ 19,067,032 $ 19,294,379

Depreciation is computed on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets as follows:

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

Asset Life - years
Permit of land use 40 - 70
Building 20 - 49
Plant, machinery and equipment 5 - 10
Motor vehicle 5 - 10
Office equipment 3-5

Depreciation relating to office equipment was included in general and administrative expenses, while all other depreciation was included in cost of revenue. For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, depreciation expense was $772,861 and $827,949, respectively.

NOTE 4 – INTANGIBLE ASSETS

Intangible assets represent the cost of medical formulas approved for production by the China Food and Drug Administration (“CFDA”). The Company did not obtain CFDA production approval for any medical formulas during the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 and no costs were reclassified from advances to intangible assets during the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Approved medical formulas are amortized from the date CFDA approval is obtained over their individually identifiable estimated useful life, which range from ten to thirteen years.  It is at least reasonably possible that a change in the estimated useful lives of the medical formulas could occur in the near term due to changes in the demand for the drugs and medicines produced from these medical formulas. Amortization expense relating to intangible assets was $22,622 and $33,481 for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, which was included in the general and administrative expenses. Medical formulas typically do not have a residual value at the end of their amortization period.

The Company evaluates each approved medical formula for impairment at the date of CFDA approval, when indications of impairment are present and also at the date of each financial statement. The Company’s evaluation is based on an estimated undiscounted net cash flow model, which considers currently available market data for the related drug and the Company’s estimated market share. If the carrying value of the medical formula exceeds the estimated future net cash flows, an impairment loss is recognized for the excess of the carrying value over the fair value of the medical formula, which is determined by the estimated discounted future net cash flows. No impairment loss was recognized during the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018.

Intangible assets consisted solely of CFDA approved medical formulas as follows:

March 31, December 31,
2019 2018
Gross carrying amount $ 5,030,260 $ 4,909,318
Accumulated amortization (4,779,994 ) (4,642,875 )
Net carrying amount $ 250,266 $ 266,443

NOTE 5 – ADVANCES FOR PURCHASES OF INTANGIBLE ASSETS

In order to expand the number of medicines the Company manufactured and marketed, it entered into contracts with independent laboratories and others for the purchase of medical formulas. Although CFDA approval had not been obtained for these medical formulas at the dates of the respective contracts, the objective of the contracts was for the Company to purchase CFDA-approved medical formulas once the CFDA approval process is completed. The Company received the titles to two patents that relate to medical formulas currently in the CFDA approval process for the year ended December 31, 2013. These patents are not expired.

Prior to entering into contracts with the Company, laboratories are typically required to complete all research and development to determine the content of the medical formula and the method to produce the generic medicine. The application to the CFDA for production approval must be made by the production facility that will produce the related product. As a result, a contract typically provides that the Company buys the medical formula from the laboratory and the laboratory is required to assist the Company in applying for and obtaining the production approval from the CFDA.

In order to promote the standard of the pharmaceutical industry in China in line with international standards, significant changes have taken place in the policies and regulations in this industry in recent years. A series of policies on consistency evaluation and drug review process have been issued, and more potential reforms and adjustments are underway. In this context, the Company believes that the uncertainties in the timetables for obtaining CFDA production approvals for products under research are increasing.

11

CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

Under the new regulations and policy environment, the criteria for formulations’ development are more stringent. The Company must supplement and improve the corresponding processes and standards to meet the latest requirements of CFDA in accordance with the requirements of consistency evaluation. As a result, the Company anticipates an extended timeline on the approval process of our current pipeline products.

Under the terms of the contracts, the laboratories are required to assist the Company in obtaining production approval for the medical formulas from the CFDA. Management monitors the status of each medical formula on a regular basis in order to assess whether the laboratories are performing adequately under the contracts. If a medical product is not approved by the CFDA, as evidenced by their issuance of a denial letter, or if the laboratory breaches the contract, the laboratory is required under the contract to provide a refund to the Company of the full amount of the payments made to the laboratory for that formula, or the Company can require the application of those payments to another medical formula with the same laboratory. As a result of the refund right, the Company is ultimately purchasing an approved medical product. Accordingly, payments made prior to the issuance of production approval by the CFDA are recorded as advances for purchases of intangible assets.

To date, no formula has failed to receive CFDA production approval nor has the Company been informed or been made aware of any formula that may fail to receive such approval. However, there is no assurance that the medical products will receive production approval, and if the Company does not receive such approval, it will enforce its contractual rights to receive a refund from the laboratory or have the payments applied to another medical formula with the same laboratory.

As of March 31, 2019, the Company was obligated to pay laboratories and others approximately $0.3 million upon the completion of various phases of contracts to obtain CFDA production approval of medical formulas.

NOTE 6 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

A member of the Company’s board of directors (“Board”) had previously advanced the Company an aggregate amount of $1,354,567 as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 which are recorded as Other payables – related parties on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The advances bear interest at a rate of 1.0% per year. Total interest expense for each of the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was $3,386.

The Company received advances totaling $164,189 and $278,696 from our Chairperson, Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer. These amounts are recorded as Other payables – related parties on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. An aggregate of $119,561 was repaid in the three months ended March 31, 2019. Compensation payable to our Chairperson, Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer is included in Other payables in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet totaling $2,055,186 and $2,051,186 as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.

NOTE 7 – BANKER’S ACCEPTANCE NOTES PAYABLE

In April 2016, the Company entered into a Banker’s Acceptance Note Agreement with a bank. Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, the Company can issue banker’s acceptance notes to any third party as payment of amounts owing to that third party. The Company is required to deposit with the bank an amount equal to the amounts represented by the banker’s acceptance notes issued to the third parties. The amount of these deposited balances is shown as “Restricted cash” on the accompanying balance sheets as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018. The maximum amount that the Company can issue under this agreement is limited to the lesser of RMB30,000,000 (approximately $4.5 million) or the amount of cash available to deposit against the banker’s acceptance notes. In addition, the agreement calls for the payment of fees equal to 0.05% of the note amount to the bank. As of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, the Company had outstanding banker’s acceptance notes in the amount of $976,622 and $1,273,940, respectively.

12

CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

NOTE 8 – CONSTRUCTION LOAN FACILITY

The Company obtained a construction loan facility, dated June 21, 2013, in the aggregate amount of RMB 80,000,000 (approximately $13 million). The loan facility is for an eight-year term, which commenced on July 11, 2013, the initial draw-down date. The proceeds of the loan were used for and are collateralized by the construction of the Company’s new production facility and the included production line equipment and machinery. The loan bears interest based upon 110% of the PRC government’s eight-year term rate effective on the actual draw-down date, subject to annual adjustments based on 110% of the floating rate for the same type of loan on the anniversary from the draw-down date and its subsequent anniversary dates. On July 10, 2016, 2017 and 2018 the interest rate was adjusted to 5.39%, 5.39% and 5.39%, respectively.  The loan required interest only payments for the first two years. Beginning July 11, 2015, the principal was due in at least two (2) annual installments with the first annual payment being due within six month period after July 10, 2015 and the second annual payment being due July 10, 2016 and each following year over the next five years through July 11, 2021 on the identical terms as described above for 2015. The Company has made all required payments due under the loan. As of March 31, 2019, the Company had no additional amounts available to it under this facility. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company made principal payments in the amount of $148,227 (RMB 1,000,000).

 Principal payments required for the remaining term of the loan facility as of March 31, 2019 are as follows:

Year Amount
2019 2,235,099
2020 2,235,099
2021 2,086,091
$ 6,556,289

Fair Value of Construction Loan Facility – Based on the borrowing rates currently available to the Company for bank loans with similar terms and maturities, the carrying amounts of the construction loan facility outstanding as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 approximated its fair value because the underlying instrument bears an interest rate that approximated current market rates.

NOTE 9 – LEASES

The Company has leases for certain office and production facilities in the PRC, which are classified as operating leases. The leases contain payment terms for fixed amounts. Options to extend are recognized as part of the lease liabilities and recognized as right to use assets when Management estimates to renew the lease. There are no residual value guarantees, no variable lease payments and no restrictions or covenants imposed by the leases. The discount rate used in measuring each lease’s liabilities and right of use assets was determined by reviewing the Company’s incremental borrowing rate at the initial measurement date. In the first quarter of 2019, operating lease cost was $23,346 and cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities for operating cash flows from operating lease was $24,814. As of March 31, 2019, the Company reported operating lease right of use assets and operating lease liabilities of $212,587 and $213,826, respectively. As of March 31, 2019, its operating lease had a weighted average remaining lease term of 2.27 years and a weighted average discount rate of 4.75%.

Minimum lease payments for the Company’s operating lease liabilities were as follows for the twelve month periods ended March 31:

2020 99,776
2021 99,776
2022 26,405
Total undiscounted cash flows 225,957
Less: Imputed interest (12,131 )
213,826
Less: Operating lease liabilities, current portion (91,597 )
Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion 122,229

The Company has leases with terms less than one year for certain provincial sales offices that are not material.

13

CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

NOTE 10 – INCOME TAXES

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect of a change in tax laws or rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.

Liabilities are established for uncertain tax positions expected to be taken in income tax returns when such positions are judged to meet the “more-likely-than-not” threshold based on the technical merits of the positions. Estimated interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions are included as a component of other expenses. Through December 31, 2018, the Company has not identified any uncertain tax positions that it has taken. U.S. income tax returns for the years ended December 31, 2015 through December 31, 2018 and the Chinese income tax return for the year ended December 31, 2018 are open for possible examination.

Under the current tax law in the PRC, the Company is and will be subject to the enterprise income tax rate of 25%.

The provision for income taxes consisted of the following:

Three Months Ended
March 31,
2019 2018
Current $ - $ -
Deferred - 25,985
Total income tax expense $ - $ 25,985

As of March 31, 2019, the Company had net operating loss carryforwards for PRC tax purposes of approximately $54.2 million which are available to offset any future taxable income through 2024. Approximately $4.0 million of these carryforwards will expire in 2019. The Company also has net operating losses for United States federal income tax purposes of approximately $5.8 million which are available to offset future taxable income, if any, through 2039.

Recent U.S. federal tax legislation, commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “U.S. Tax Reform”), was signed into law on December 22, 2017. The U.S. Tax Reform significantly modified the U.S. Internal Revenue Code by, among other things, reducing the statutory U.S. federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21% for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017; limiting and/or eliminating many business deductions; migrating the U.S. to a territorial tax system with a one-time transition tax on a mandatory deemed repatriation of previously deferred foreign earnings of certain foreign subsidiaries; subject to certain limitations, generally eliminating U.S. corporate income tax on dividends from foreign subsidiaries; and providing for new taxes on certain foreign earnings.

In assessing the realizability of deferred tax assets, Management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.  The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which those differences become deductible or tax loss carry forwards are utilized.  Management considers projected future taxable income and tax planning strategies in making this assessment.  Based upon an assessment of the level of historical taxable income and projections for future taxable income over the periods on which the deferred tax assets are deductible or can be utilized, Management believes it is not likely for the Company to realize all benefits of the deferred tax assets as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018.  Therefore, the Company provided for a valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets of $27,722,851 and $26,990,951 as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.

The Company also incurred various other taxes, comprised primarily of business taxes, value-added taxes, urban construction taxes, education surcharges and others. Any unpaid amounts are reflected on the balance sheets as accrued taxes payable.

NOTE 11 – FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. To measure fair value, a hierarchy has been established which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. This hierarchy uses three levels of inputs to measure the fair value of assets and liabilities as follows: Level 1 – Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities; Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 including quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in less active markets, or other observable inputs that can be corroborated by observable market data; and Level 3 – Unobservable inputs supported by little or no market activity for financial instruments whose value is determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies, or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation.

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CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

The Company uses fair value to measure the value of the banker’s acceptance notes it holds. The banker’s acceptance notes are recorded at cost which approximates fair value.  The Company held the following assets and liabilities recorded at fair value:

Fair Value Measurements at
March 31, Reporting Date Using
Description 2019 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Banker’s acceptance notes $ 51,424 $ - $ 51,424 $ -
Total $ 51,424 $ - $ 51,424 $ -

Fair Value Measurements at
December 31, Reporting Date Using
Description 2018 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Banker’s acceptance notes $ 20,579 $ - $ 20,579 $ -
Total $ 20,579 $ - $ 20,579 $ -

NOTE 12 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

The Company is authorized to issue 95,000,000 shares of common stock, $0.001 par value, and 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock, $0.001 par value. The preferred stock may be issued in series with such designations, preferences, stated values, rights, qualifications or limitations as determined solely by the Company’s Board.

Employee Stock Options

2010 Incentive Plan

On November 12, 2010, the Company’s Board of Directors adopted the Company’s 2010 Incentive Plan (the “Plan”), which was then approved by stockholders on December 22, 2010. The Plan gave the Company the ability to grant stock options, restricted stock, stock appreciation rights and performance units to its employees, directors and consultants, or those who will become employees, directors and consultants of the Company and/or its subsidiaries. The Plan currently allows for equity awards of up to 4,000,000 shares of common stock. Through March 31, 2019, there were 175,000 shares of restricted stock granted and outstanding under the Plan.  No options were outstanding as of March 31, 2019 under the Plan.

There were no securities issued from the Plan during each of the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018.

The Company recognized no compensation expense because there was no grant or modification to any awards of common shares or stock options during each of the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018.

The fair value of each stock option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model. Expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of the Company’s common stock prices. The Company uses historical data to estimate employee termination rates. The expected term of stock granted is determined by the simplified method, which is one-half of the original contractual term. The simplified method is used due to the lack of historical share option exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term. The risk-free rate for periods within the contractual life of the option is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant.

As of March 31, 2019, there was no remaining unrecognized compensation expense related to stock options or restricted stock grants.

15

CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2019 AND 2018 (UNAUDITED)

NOTE 13 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Economic environment - Substantially all of the Company’s operations are conducted in the PRC, and therefore the Company is subject to special considerations and significant risks not typically associated with companies operating in the United States of America. These risks include, among others, the political, economic and legal environments and fluctuations in the foreign currency exchange rate. The Company’s results from operations may be adversely affected by changes in the political and social conditions in the PRC, and by changes in governmental policies with respect to laws and regulations, anti-inflationary measures, currency conversion and remittance abroad, and rates and methods of taxation, among other things. The unfavorable changes in global macroeconomic factors may also adversely affect the Company’s operations.

In addition, all of the Company’s revenue is denominated in the PRC’s currency of Renminbi (RMB), which must be converted into other currencies before remittance out of the PRC. Both the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of foreign currencies abroad require approval of the PRC government.

NOTE 14 – CONCENTRATIONS

For the three months ended March 31, 2019, no customer accounted for more than 10% of sales and two customers accounted for 49.3% and 10.6% of accounts receivable. Three suppliers accounted for 26.7%, 20.6% and 11.0% of the Company’s raw material purchases.

For the three months ended March 31, 2018, no customer accounted for more than 10% of sales and two customers accounted for 47.2% and 13.6% of accounts receivable. Two suppliers accounted for 32.4% and 28.7% of the Company’s raw material purchases.

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The statements contained in this report with respect to our financial condition, results of operations and business that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “seek,” “estimate,” “project,” “could,” or the negative thereof or other variations thereon, or by discussions of strategy that involve risks and uncertainties. Management wishes to caution the readers that any such forward-looking statements contained in this report reflect our current beliefs with respect to future events and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including, but not limited to, economic, competitive, regulatory, technological, key employees, and general business factors affecting our operations, markets, growth, services, products, licenses and other factors, some of which are described in this report and some of which are discussed in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). These forward-looking statements are only estimates or predictions. No assurances can be given regarding the achievement of future results, as actual results may differ materially as a result of risks facing our company, and actual events may differ from the assumptions underlying the statements that have been made regarding anticipated events.

These risk factors should be considered in connection with any subsequent written or oral forward-looking statements that we or persons acting on our behalf may issue. All written and oral forward-looking statements made in connection with this report that are attributable to our company or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by these cautionary statements. Given these uncertainties, we caution investors not to unduly rely on our forward-looking statements. We do not undertake any obligation to review or confirm analysts’ expectations or estimates or to release publicly any revisions to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this report or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by applicable law or regulation.

Business Overview & Recent Developments

We continue to feel sustained pressure from the heightened requirements of drug registration standards, consistency evaluations, and the rising costs of clinical trials in the first quarter of 2019. At the same time, the improvement of environmental protection tax law, air, water and soil pollution control standards and the strengthening of supervision bring about the increase of environmental protection costs. In this context, the shortage of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) and intermediates leads to the increase of raw materials costs.

On March 5, 2016, the Chinese State Council issued “Opinions on Carrying out Consistency Evaluations of the Quality and Efficacy of Generic Drugs” (the “Opinions”). The Opinions defined the objectives of evaluations, establish deadlines, determine selection criteria for reference drugs, call for a rational selection of evaluation methods, identify pharmaceutical manufacturers as the principle generic drug consistency evaluations, and set forth corresponding incentives. Subsequently, in May of 2016, the China Food and Drug Administration (the “CFDA”) issued “Comments from the General Office of the State Council on the Consistency Evaluations of the Efficacy and Quality of Generic Drugs”, which further elaborated on assessment processes and related technical rules. Consistency evaluations apply to the majority of our current existing marketed and pipeline products. In this environment, based on the management team’s assessment of each pipeline product based on (i) the adjusted CFDA approval criteria and clinical trial requirements, (ii) the estimated additional investment needed for consistency evaluation and (iii) the potential return on investment for such pipeline product once launched into the market, the management team decided to terminate the progress of certain pipeline products. Complying with consistency evaluations has and will become our core task in the near future and will therefore significantly impact our operations as well as our industrial structure.

17

In order to support our existing products package we remain focused on pipeline development. We have experienced delays in obtaining approval for certain products in our pipeline because of revisions of and enhancements to CFDA approval criteria and processes. These revisions have resulted in additional supplemental materials and trials, higher costs, and longer approval times for certain applications.

The status of our pipeline products as of March 31, 2019 remains the same as we have reported in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 28, 2019.

Market Trends

Consumer demand for medicine is relatively stable and is generally unaffected by seasonal business cycles. However, we have noticed that the growth rate of the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry has been higher than GDP growth rates in China. According to the data released by the State Council of China, the national budget for health care in 2018 was RMB1,529 billion (approximately $224.06 billion), which represented an increase of RMB84 billion (approximately $12.3 billion) over the previous year, an increase of 2.5% over that of the national financial expenditure, accounting for 7.3% of the entire national financial expenditure. On top of that, from 2013 to 2017, the cumulative expenditure on medical and health care in China totaled RMB5,950 billion (approximately $871.91 billion), which represented an average annual increase of 11.7%, 2% higher than that of the national financial expenditure in the same period.

The rapid development of the pharmaceutical industry in China has been driven by the continuous growth of total healthcare costs, the establishment and improvement of the universal health-care insurance system, the increases in medical expenditures per capita, the aging population, and the changes in the disease spectrum. However, development has been negatively impacted by factors like health-care insurance cost controls and price pressure in drug tenders in recent years.

The Central Committee Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China approved the “Healthy China 2030 Plan” in August 2016, which proposed reducing personal hygiene spending to approximately 28% of total healthcare expenditures by 2020 and 25% of total healthcare expenditures by 2030.

In order to achieve the objectives of the above-mentioned Healthy China 2030 Plan in the context of an aging population and an improving universal health-care insurance system, we believe that the hygiene spending proportion of total fiscal expenditures will increase and that net annual health-care insurance expenditures will increase as well. We anticipate that the use of generic drugs as a cost-effective medical solution will be further promoted as a way to reduce the payment pressures of health-care insurance. As a generic drug company we are presented with a huge domestic market, and through further upgrades, in conjunction with consistency evaluations, could allow us to meet European and American production standards, enabling us to export our products to overseas markets.

18

In general, demand for pharmaceutical products is still experiencing steady growth in China. The ongoing generic drug consistency evaluations and reform of China’s drug production registration and review policies will have major effects on the future development of our industry and may change its business patterns. We will continue to actively adapt to state policy guidance and further evaluate market conditions for our current existing products, pipeline products and competition in the market in order to optimize our development strategy.

Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019

Revenue

Revenue decreased by 19.0% to $2.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019, as compared to $3.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. This decrease was mainly due to market fluctuations.

Set forth below are our revenues by product category in millions (USD) for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018:

Three Months Ended
March 31,
Product Category 2019 2018 Net Change % Change
CNS Cerebral & Cardio Vascular 0.46 0.51 -0.05 -10 %
Anti-Viral/ Infection & Respiratory 1.85 2.34 -0.49 -21 %
Digestive Diseases 0.12 0.17 -0.06 -32 %
Other 0.50 0.59 -0.09 -16 %

The most significant revenue decrease in terms of dollar amount was in our “Anti-Viral/Infection & Respiratory” product category, which generated $1.85 million in sales revenue in the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to $2.34 million for the same period a year ago, which is a decrease of $0.49 million. Thisdecrease was mainly due to the decrease in sales of Cefaclor, which was caused by market volatility.

Our “Other” product category sales also decreased by $0.09 million to $0.50 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019 from $0.59 million for the same period in 2018, which was mainly due to the decrease in sales of Vitamin B6 that was caused by market volatility.

Our “Digestive Diseases” product category generated $0.12 million and $0.17 million of sales in the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Sales in the “CNS Cerebral & Cardio Vascular” product category decreased to $0.46 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019, as compared to $0.51 million for the same period in 2018.

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Three Months Ended
March 31,
Product Category 2019 2018
CNS Cerebral & Cardio Vascular 16 % 14 %
Anti-Viral/ Infection & Respiratory 63 % 65 %
Digestive Diseases 4 % 5 %
Other 17 % 16 %

For the three months ended March 31, 2019, revenue breakdown by product category remained similar to that of the same period in 2018. Sales of the “Anti-Viral/Infection & Respiratory” products category represented 65% and 66% of total sales in the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The “CNS Cerebral & Cardio Vascular” product category represented 16% and 14% of total revenue in the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The “Digestive Diseases” product category represented 4% and 5% of total revenue in the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The “Other” product category represented 17% and 16% of revenues in 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Cost of Revenue

For the three months ended March 31, 2019, our cost of revenue was $2.3 million, or 78% of total revenue, while cost of revenue was $2.6 million, or 71% of total revenue, for the same period in 2018.

Gross Profit and Gross Margin

Gross profit for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $0.7 million, as compared to $1.1 million during the same period in 2018. Our gross profit margin in the three months ended March 31, 2019 was 22.4% as compared to 29.1% during the same period in 2018. The decrease in our gross profit margin was mainly due to the decrease in revenue and the increased ratio of fixed cost to revenue.

Selling Expenses

Our selling expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 were $0.5 million and $0.7 million, respectively. Selling expenses accounted for 16.3% of the total revenue in the three months ended March 31, 2019, as compared to 18.8% during the same period in 2018. Because of adjustments in our sales practices, due to healthcare reform policies, we had reduced number of personnel and expenses to efficiently support our sales and the collection of accounts receivable.

General and Administrative Expenses

Our general and administrative expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2019 were $0.4 million, which represented a decrease of $0.1 million, as compared to $0.5 million for the same period in 2018. General and administrative expenses accounted for 14.6% and 13.6% of our total revenues in the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

20

Research and Development Expenses

Our research and development expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2019 were $0.07 million, as compared to $0.02 million in the same period in 2018. Research and development expenses accounted for 2.4% and 0.6% of our total revenues in the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The consistency evaluations discussed under the “Business Overview & Recent Developments” section hereof is expected to have a significant impact on all generic products not only in our pipeline, but also throughout the existing Chinese market for similar generic products. Because of the continuous introduction of detailed implementation rules under this policy, our pipeline did not experience any further development in the first quarter of 2019.

Bad Debt Expenses

Our bad debt expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $13,312, as compared to $1,834 for the same period in 2018.

We increased our customer credit or payment terms from 90 days to 180 days in the fourth quarter of 2018 in order to better reflect our actual operating environment. Due to the peculiar circumstances affecting the Chinese pharmaceutical market, deferred payments to pharmaceutical companies by state-owned hospitals and local medicine distributors are a normal phenomenon. Our customers are primarily pharmaceutical distributors that sell our products to mostly government-backed hospitals. Therefore, the aging of our receivables from our customers tends to be longer-term.

The amount of accounts receivable that were past due (or the amount of accounts receivable that were more than 180 days old) was $0.15 million and $0.22 million as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.

The following table illustrates our accounts receivable aging distribution in terms of percentage of total accounts receivable as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018:

March 31, December 31,
2019 2018
1 - 180 Days 3.9 % 3.8 %
180 - 360 Days 0.7 % 1.2 %
360 - 720 Days 0.5 % 0.3 %
> 720 Days 94.9 % 94.7 %
Total 100.0 % 100.0 %

In the fourth quarter of 2018, our bad debt allowance estimate has been updated to a policy which requires no allowance of accounts receivable recognized that are within 180 days old, 10% of accounts receivable that are between 180 days and 365 days old, 70% of accounts receivable that are between 365 days and 720 days old, and 100% of accounts receivable that are greater than 720 days old. Prior to that, our policy was no allowance of accounts receivable recognized that are within 90 days old, 10% of accounts receivable that are between 90 days and 365 days old, 70% of accounts receivable that are between 365 days and 720 days old, and 100% of accounts receivable that are greater than 720 days old.

21

We recognize bad debt expenses per actual write-offs as well as changes of allowance for doubtful accounts. To the extent that our current allowance for doubtful accounts is higher than that of the previous period, we recognize a bad debt expense for the difference during the current period, and, when the current allowance is lower than that of the previous period, we recognize a bad debt benefit for the difference. The allowance for doubtful accounts was $18.3 million and $17.8 million as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. The changes in the allowances for doubtful accounts during the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:

For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
2019 2018
Balance, Beginning of Period $ 17,815,075 $ 18,209,734
Bad debt expense (benefit) 13,312 1,834
Foreign currency translation adjustment 467,505 653,511
Balance, End of Period $ 18,295,892 $ 18,865,079

Loss from Operations

Our operating loss for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $0.3 million, compared to an operating loss of $0.1 million during the same period in 2018.

Net Interest Expense

Net interest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was $0.08 million and $0.1 million, respectively.

Income Tax expense

Our income tax rate for our wholly owned subsidiary, Hainan Helpson Medical & Biotechnology Co., Ltd.(“Helpson”) was 25% for both the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018. We did not have any income tax expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019, while the income tax expense was $0.03 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. Helpson’s tax rate for 2018 was 25% and will remain at this rate for the foreseeable future.

Net Loss

Net Loss for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $0.4 million, as compared to a net loss of $0.3 million for the same period a year ago. The increase in net loss was mainly the result of decreased revenue, whereas the expenditures did not decrease in proportion to revenue, which was due to fixed costs.

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For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, loss per basic and diluted common share were both $0.01.

The number of basic and diluted weighted-average outstanding shares used to calculate loss per share was 43,579,557 for both the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our principal source of liquidity is cash generated from operations.Our cash and cash equivalents were $1.0 million, representing 2.1% of our total assets, as of March 31, 2019, as compared to $1.2 million, representing 2.6% of our total assets as of December 31, 2018. All of the $1.0 million of cash and cash equivalents as of March 31, 2019, is considered to be reinvested indefinitely in the Company’s Chinese subsidiary, Helpson and is not expected to be available for payment of dividends or for other payments to its parent company or to its shareholders. We entered into an eight-year construction loan facility on September 21, 2013. The total construction loan facility amount was RMB 80 million (approximately $11.7 million), which had been fully utilized through May 7, 2014. As of March 31, 2019, we have accumulatively repaid the principal of RMB 36 million (approximately $5.2 million) of the construction loans, per the payback schedule. The construction loan installments to be repaid within the next 12 months are about $2.1 million as of March 31, 2019. Cash flow generated from operating activities was used to fund our daily operating expenses as well as the repayment of our loan facility.

Based on our current operating plan, management believes that cash provided by operations will be sufficient to meet our working capital needs and our anticipated capital expenditures, including expenditures for consistency evaluations and new formula acquisitions for the next twelve months. However, if circumstances change and we do not follow our operating plan as expected, we may be required to seek additional capital and/or to reduce certain discretionary spending, which could have a material adverse effect on our ability to achieve our business objectives. Notwithstanding the foregoing, we may seek additional financing as necessary for expansion purposes, which may include debt and/or equity financing when we believe market conditions are most advantageous. Although our Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer had advanced funds of RMB 1,579,760 (approximately $235,394) for working capital during 2018, there can be no assurances that this will be the case in the future. An aggregate of RMB 800,000 (approximately $119,561) was repaid to the Chairperson in the first quarter of 2019. There can be no assurance that any additional financing will be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities was $0.1 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019, as compared to $0.5 million for the same period in 2018.

As of March 31, 2019, our net accounts receivable were $0.8 million, as compared to $0.9 million, as of December 31, 2018.

23

Total inventory was $4.9 million, as of March 31, 2019, and $5.1 million as of December 31, 2018.

Investing Activities

During the three months ended March 31, 2019, net cash used in investing activities was $73,866 as compared to $3,627 for the three months ended March 31, 2018.

Financing Activities

Cash flow used in financing activities was $0.3 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019, as compared to $0.2 million in the three months ended March 31, 2018. The financing activities that occurred in the three months ended March 31, 2019 were primarily related to payments to related party payables, the scheduled payments of the construction loan facility described in the first paragraph of this section entitled “Liquidity and Capital Resources” and as discussed in Note 8 to the consolidated financial statements.

According to the relevant laws of the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”), companies registered in the PRC, including our PRC subsidiary, Helpson, are required to allocate at least ten percent (10%) of their after-tax net income, as determined under accounting standards and regulations in the PRC, to statutory surplus reserve accounts until the reserve account balances reach fifty percent (50%) of the companies’ registered capital prior to their remittance of funds out of the PRC. Allocations to these reserves and funds can only be used for specific purposes and are not transferrable to the parent company in the form of loans, advances or cash dividends.As of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, Helpson’s net assets totaled $28,175,000 and $27,485,000, respectively. Due to the restriction on dividend distribution to overseas shareholders, the amount of Helpson’s net assets that was designated for general and statutory capital reserves, and thus could not be transferred to our parent company as cash dividends, was $8,145,000 and $8,145,000 (50% of registered capital) as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.Since the amount that Helpson must set aside for the statutory surplus fund only accounts for 28.9% and 29.6%, respectively, of its total net assets, this reserve does not have a major impact on our liquidity. There were no allocations to the statutory surplus reserve accounts during the three months ended March 31, 2019.

The Chinese government also imposes controls on the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of China.  Our businesses and assets are primarily denominated in RMB.  All foreign exchange transactions take place either through the People’s Bank of China or other banks authorized to buy and sell foreign currencies at the exchange rates quoted by the People’s Bank of China. Approval of foreign currency payments by the People’s Bank of China or other regulatory institutions requires the submission of a payment application form together with certain invoices and executed contracts. The currency exchange control procedures imposed by Chinese government authorities may restrict the ability of Helpson, our Chinese subsidiary, to transfer its net assets to our parent company through loans, advances or cash dividends.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As of March 31, 2019, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

Commitments

As of March 31, 2019, we were obligated to pay laboratories and other service providers approximately $0.30 million over approximately the next four years upon completion of various phases of contracts required to obtain CFDA production approval for our medical formulas.

Critical Accounting Policies

Management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Our financial statements reflect the selection and application of accounting policies that require management to make significant estimates and judgments. The discussion of our critical accounting policies contained in Note 1 to our consolidated financial statements,Organization and Significant Accounting Policies, is incorporated herein by reference.

24

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

As a “smaller reporting company” as defined by Item 10 of Regulation S-K, we are not required to provide information required by this item.

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Our Chief Executive Officer and interim Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our “disclosure controls and procedures” (as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e)) as of the end of the period covered by this quarterly report. Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act (a) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms and (b) is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and interim Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.

Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives as described above. Based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and interim Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of March 31, 2019 to satisfy the objectives for which they are intended. This was due to the material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting, with respect to our lack of accounting financial reporting personnel who were knowledgeable in U.S. GAAP, as disclosed in our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, filed with the SEC on March 28, 2019. Notwithstanding these material weaknesses, management has concluded that our consolidated financial statements included in this report are fairly stated in all material respects in accordance with U.S. GAAP for each period presented herein.

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting identified in connection with the evaluation required by paragraph (d) of Exchange Act Rules 13a-15 or 15d-15 that occurred during our last fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

25

PART II OTHER INFORMATION

Item 6. Exhibits

The exhibits required by this item are set forth in the Exhibit Index attached hereto.

26

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC.
Date: May 14, 2019 By: /s/ Zhilin Li
Name: Zhilin Li
Title: President and Chief Executive Officer
(principal executive officer)
Date: May 14, 2019 By: /s/ Zhilin Li
Name: Zhilin Li
Title: Interim Chief Financial Officer
(principal financial officer and principal accounting officer)

27

EXHIBIT INDEX

No. Description
31.1 - Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2 - Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1 - Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS - XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH - XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL - XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF - XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB - XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE - XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

28

";


Webplus: CPHI/20190514/10-Q/2_EX-31.1/000.htm SEC Original: f10q0319ex31-1_chinapharma.htm
CERTIFICATION OF OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 I, Zhilin Li, certify that: 1. I have reviewed this report on Form 10-Q of China Pharma Holdings, Inc.; 2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of



s:5399:" EX-31.1 2 f10q0319ex31-1_chinapharma.htm CERTIFICATION

Exhibit 31.1

CERTIFICATION OF

PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICER

PURSUANT TO SECTION 302

OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

I, Zhilin Li, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this report on Form 10-Q of China Pharma Holdings, Inc.;

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent function):

a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal controls over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

Date: May 14, 2019
/s/ Zhilin Li
Name: Zhilin Li
Title: Chief Executive Officer

";


Webplus: CPHI/20190514/10-Q/3_EX-31.2/000.htm SEC Original: f10q0319ex31-2_chinapharma.htm
CERTIFICATION OF PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL OFFICER OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 I, Zhilin Li, certify that: 1. I have reviewed this report on Form 10-Q of China Pharma Holdings, Inc.; 2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made,



s:5487:" EX-31.2 3 f10q0319ex31-2_chinapharma.htm CERTIFICATION

Exhibit 31.2

CERTIFICATION OF

PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL OFFICER

PURSUANT TO SECTION 302

OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

I, Zhilin Li, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this report on Form 10-Q of China Pharma Holdings, Inc.;

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent function):

a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal controls over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

Date: May 14, 2019
/s/ Zhilin Li
Name: Zhilin Li
Title: Interim Chief Financial Officer
(principal financial officer and principal accounting officer)

";


Webplus: CPHI/20190514/10-Q/4_EX-32.1/000.htm SEC Original: f10q0319ex32-1_chinapharma.htm
18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350, SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 (2) The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company. Dated: May 14, 2019 President and Chief Executive Officer (principal financial officer and principal accounting officer) EX-32.1 4 f10q0319ex32-1_chinapharma.htm CERTIFICATION



s:2672:" EX-32.1 4 f10q0319ex32-1_chinapharma.htm CERTIFICATION

Exhibit 32.1

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

The undersigned hereby certifies, in her capacity as Chief Executive Officer and interim Chief Financial Officer of China Pharma Holdings, Inc. (the “Company”), for the purposes of 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that to the best of her knowledge:

(1) The Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2019 (the “Report”) fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and

(2) The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.

Dated: May 14, 2019
/s/ Zhilin Li
Name: Zhilin Li
President and Chief Executive Officer
(principal executive officer)
/s/ Zhilin Li
Name: Zhilin Li
Title: Interim Chief Financial Officer
(principal financial officer and principal
accounting officer)

This certification accompanies each Report pursuant to § 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and shall not, except to the extent required by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, be deemed filed by the Company for purposes of §18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

A signed original of this written statement required by Section 906 has been provided to the Company and will be retained by the Company and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff upon request.

";

Company Info:

Ticker: CPHI, Company: CHINA PHARMA HOLDINGS, INC., Type: 10-Q, Date: 2019-05-14, XBRL Interactive FinancialsCIK: 0001106644, Location: F4, SIC: 2834, SIC Desc: PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
Business Phone & Address:
2ND FLOOR, NO. 17, JINPAN ROAD, HAIKOU
HAINAN PROVINCE 570216

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