CCCR [China Bat] 424B5:

Ticker: CCCR, Company: China Bat Group, Inc., Type: 424B5, Date: 2019-04-12
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Webplus: CCCR/20190412/424B5/1/000.htm SEC Original: f424b5041119_chinabatgroup.htm



s:286235:" 424B5 1 f424b5041119_chinabatgroup.htm PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Prospectus Supplement

Page
ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT S-ii
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS S-iii
PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT SUMMARY S-1
THE OFFERING S-3
RISK FACTORS S-4
USE OF PROCEEDS S-8
DIVIDEND POLICY S-10
DILUTION S-9
CAPITALIZATION S-11
DESCRIPTION OF OUR SECURITIES WE ARE OFFERING S-12
PRIVATE PLACEMENT TRANSACTION OF WARRANTS S-12
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION S-13
LEGAL MATTERS S-15
EXPERTS S-15
INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE S-15
DISCLOSURE OF COMMISSION POSITION ON INDEMNIFICATION FOR SECURITIES LAW VIOLATIONS S-15
WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION S-16

Prospectus
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY 1
RISK FACTORS 3
DISCLOSURE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION 25
USE OF PROCEEDS 25
DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STOCK AN SECURITIES WE MAY OFFER 26
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION 33
LEGAL MATTERS 35
EXPERTS 35
WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 35
INFORMATION INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE 35

You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. We have not authorized anyone else to provide you with additional or different information. We are offering to sell, and seeking offers to buy, shares of common stock only in jurisdictions where offers and sales are permitted. You should not assume that the information in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the front of those documents or that any document incorporated by reference is accurate as of any date other than its filing date.

No action is being taken in any jurisdiction outside the United States to permit a public offering of the shares of common stock or possession or distribution of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus in that jurisdiction. Persons who come into possession of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus in jurisdictions outside the United States are required to inform themselves about and to observe any restrictions as to this offering and the distribution of this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus applicable to that jurisdiction.

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT

On April 26, 2017, we filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-3 (File No. 333-217473) utilizing a shelf registration process relating to the securities described in this prospectus supplement, which registration statement was declared effective on July 21, 2017. Under this shelf registration process, we may, from time to time, sell up to $30 million in the aggregate of shares of common stock, shares of preferred stock, debt securities, warrants, subscription rights and units. On December 7, 2017, we filed with the SEC a prospectus supplement where we offered an aggregate of 200,000 shares of our common stock with an accompanying warrant to purchase up to 80,000 (pre-split) shares of our common stock. Approximately $25.6 million will remain available for sale following the offering and as of the date of this prospectus supplement.

This document is in two parts. The first part is this prospectus supplement, which describes the specific terms of this common stock offering and also adds to and updates information contained in the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference into the prospectus. The second part, the accompanying prospectus, gives more general information, some of which does not apply to this offering. You should read this entire prospectus supplement as well as the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference that are described under “Where You Can Find More Information” in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus.

If the description of the offering varies between this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus, you should rely on the information contained in this prospectus supplement. However, if any statement in one of these documents is inconsistent with a statement in another document having a later date – for example, a document incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus – the statement in the document having the later date modifies or supersedes the earlier statement. Except as specifically stated, we are not incorporating by reference any information submitted under Item 2.02 or Item 7.01 of any Current Report on Form 8-K into any filing under the Securities Act or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, into this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus.

Any statement contained in a document incorporated by reference, or deemed to be incorporated by reference, into this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus will be deemed to be modified or superseded for purposes of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus to the extent that a statement contained herein, therein or in any other subsequently filed document which also is incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus modifies or supersedes that statement. Any such statement so modified or superseded will not be deemed, except as so modified or superseded, to constitute a part of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus.

We further note that the representations, warranties and covenants made by us in any agreement that is filed as an exhibit to any document that is incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus were made solely for the benefit of the parties to such agreement, including, in some cases, for the purpose of allocating risk among the parties to such agreements, and should not be deemed to be a representation, warranty or covenant to you unless you are a party to such agreement. Moreover, such representations, warranties or covenants were accurate only as of the date when made or expressly referenced therein. Accordingly, such representations, warranties and covenants should not be relied on as accurately representing the current state of our affairs unless you are a party to such agreement.

Unless we have indicated otherwise, or the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus to “GLG,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” or similar terms refer to refer to China Bat Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries.

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

Certain statements contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, including the documents referred to or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement or statements of our management referring to our summarizing the contents of this prospectus supplement, include “forward-looking statements”. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. Our actual results may differ materially or perhaps significantly from those discussed herein, or implied by, these forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are identified by words such as “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “estimate,” “plan,” “project” and other similar expressions. In addition, any statements that refer to expectations or other characterizations of future events or circumstances are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement or our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, include, but are not necessarily limited to, those relating to:

expand our customer base;

broaden our service and product offerings;

enhance our risk management capabilities;

improve our operational efficiency;

our ability to raise sufficient fund to expand our operations;

attract, retain and motivate talented employees;

a decrease in demand for automobiles renting and weakness in the automotive industry generally;

navigate an evolving regulatory environment; and

defend ourselves against litigation, regulatory, privacy or other claims.

Development of a liquid trading market for our securities; and

Our plan to maintain compliance with NASDAQ continue listing requirement

The foregoing does not represent an exhaustive list of matters that may be covered by the forward-looking statements contained herein or risk factors with which we are faced that may cause our actual results to differ from those anticipated in our forward-looking statements. Please see “Risk Factors” in our reports filed with the SEC or in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus for additional risks which could adversely impact our business and financial performance.

Moreover, new risks regularly emerge and it is not possible for our management to predict or articulate all risks we face, nor can we assess the impact of all risks on our business or the extent to which any risk, or combination of risks, may cause actual results to differ from those contained in any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements included in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are based on information available to us on the date of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus, as applicable. Except to the extent required by applicable laws or rules, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained above and throughout (or incorporated by reference in) this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus.

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PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT SUMMARY

The following summary highlights selected information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement. This summary does not contain all of the information you should consider before investing in the securities. Before making an investment decision, you should read the entire prospectus and any supplement hereto carefully, including the risk factors section as well as the financial statements and the notes to the financial statements incorporated herein by reference.

Our Company

China Bat Group, Inc., (formerly known as China Commercial Credit, Inc.) has become a used luxurious car leasing business operating in China, after it disposed its direct loans, loan guarantees and financial leasing services to small-to-medium sized businesses, farmers and individuals (the “Micro-lending Business”) in July 2018. Our mission is to fill the significant void in the market place by serving business professionals, luxury car enthusiasts and other customers with luxury car rental services, which has been under-served due to the growing demand from the country’s rapid expansion of the middle class. Our current operations consist of renting out our luxurious pre-owned automobiles from its stores in the municipalities of Beijing and Tianjin, as well as in the Hebei province.

The Company operates a luxurious car business that is conducted under the brand name “Batcar” through the Company’s VIE entity, Beijing Tianxing Kunlun Technology Co. Ltd (“Beijing Tianxing”), from its headquarters in Beijing.

Our Current Business

During the six months ended December 31, 2018, the Company, through Beijing Tianxing, which was controlled by the Company via contractual arrangements, offers our customers the opportunity to rent luxurious pre-owned automobiles in Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, the Company provides over 16 brands and over 60 types of high-end cars for leasing, of which eight cars are owned by the Company. The remaining cars are owned by various peer companies and are offered by them to other peer companies in a car pool. As a member of the car pool, the Company is able to lease the cars of its peer companies at a discounted rate and thereby provide an increased variety of high-end cars to its customers. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company purchased seven used luxurious cars and disposed of one used luxurious car for operating lease services and generated operating lease income of US$488,062 from the leasing business.

By the end of December 31, 2018, the Company had six luxurious cars in stock and purchased two additional cars as of the date of this prospectus supplement. Management is undergoing negotiations with a number of Chinese financial institutions, including investment management companies, regarding capital raising. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to raise sufficient funds from these or other sources to achieve our business goal of increasing our stock of luxurious cars and expanding our operations into other cities such as Shanghai, Chengdu, Shenzhen, Sanya, and Xiamen. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, the Company has completed the preparatory work necessary to begin official operations in Shanghai and Chengdu.

Disposition of the Micro-lending Business

Historically, our core business has been the Micro-lending business conducted through Wujiang Luxiang Rural Microcredit Co., Ltd. (“Wujiang Luxiang”), an entity we controlled via certain contractual arrangements and Pride Financial Leasing (Suzhou) Co. Ltd. (“PFL”), our wholly owned subsidiary. However, since 2016, the microcredit companies in Wujiang area went through the most difficult time since their inceptions in 2008. For the year ended December 31, 2017, we had a loss of $5,486,667 and a net loss of $10,699,740 compared to a revenue of $2,246,807 and net loss of $2,580,136 in 2016, a change of 344% and an increase of 315%, respectively. As a result of the deteriorating economic condition, we experienced a substantial increase in the amount of default loans in both our direct lending and guarantee business. The amount of underlying loans we guaranteed has been increased by 6.7% to $11.6 million as of December 31, 2017 compared to $10.9 million as of December 31, 2016. As of March 31, 2018, eleven cases against the Company were finally adjudicated by the Court, in which the Company was jointly liable, together with the defaulted customers and other guarantees, to repayment the principal, interest and penalties of $6.91 million. Additionally, three cases against the Company have not been adjudicated by the Court, in which the Company is jointly liable, together with the defaulted customers and other guarantees, to repayment the principal, interest and penalties of $2.97 million. In addition, the Department of Finance of Wujiang region has been evaluating the collection and performance of Wujiang Luxiang and may initiate proceeding to revoke Wujiang Luxiang’s business license if the operation is not improved. The Company’s financial leasing business has been on hold since October 2015 after we signed two leasing contracts worth a total of total $4.88 million February 2015. We did not have further funds to deploy in the financial leasing business and plan to hold off expansion of the leasing business

S-1

The Company believed it is very difficult, if possible at all, to make collections on the default loans and guarantee obligations paid on behalf of guarantees. As such, the Company sought to dispose the Micro-lending Business while focusing on the luxurious car leasing or engage in other more profitable businesses.

On June 19, 2018, the Company, HK Xu Ding Co, Limited, a private limited company duly organized under the laws of Hong Kong (the “Purchaser”) and CCCR International Investment Ltd., a business company incorporated in the British Virgin Islands with limited liability (“CCC BVI”) entered into certain Share Purchase Agreement (the “Purchase Agreement”). CCC BVI is the sole shareholder of CCC International Investment Ltd. (“CCC HK”), a company incorporated under the laws of the Hong Kong S.A.R. of the PRC, which is the sole shareholder of WFOE and PFL. WFOE, via a series of contractual arrangements, controls Wujiang Luxiang.Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, the Purchaser agreed to purchase CCC BVI in exchange of cash purchase price of $500,000. The transaction contemplated by the Purchase Agreement is hereby referred as theDisposition.

The Disposition was approved by the board of directors of the Company. Benchmark Company, LLC rendered a fairness opinion in connection with the Disposition, indicating that the Consideration to be received by the Company in the transaction is fair to the Company’s shareholders from a financial point of view,

On July 10, 2018, the parties completed all the share transfer registration procedure as required by the laws of British Virgin Islands and all the other closing conditions have been satisfied, as a result, the Disposition contemplated by the Purchase Agreement is completed. Upon completion of the Disposition, Purchaser became the sole shareholder of CCC BVI and as a result, assumed all assets and obligations of all the subsidiaries and VIE entities owned or controlled by CCC BVI and the Company’s sole business became the leasing of used luxurious car carried out by the Company’s VIE entity.

Corporate Information

China Bat Group, Inc. is a holding company that was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware on December 19, 2011.

Our principal executive offices are located at Room 104, No. 33 Section D, No. 6 Middle Xierqi Road, Haidian District, Beijing, China 100085. Our telephone number is +86 (010) 59441080. Our NASDAQ symbol is GLG, and we make our SEC filings available on the Investor Relations page of our website, http://ir.imbatcar.com/. Information contained on our website is not part of this prospectus.

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THE OFFERING

Issuer: China Bat Group, Inc.
Shares of common stock offered by us pursuant to this prospectus supplement: 1,680,000
Offering Price: $2.20 per share
Shares of common stock outstanding before this offering: 5,526,992
Shares of common stock to be outstanding immediately after this offering (1): 7,206,992
Use of proceeds: We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for working capital and other general corporate purposes. See “Use of Proceeds” on page S-10 of this prospectus supplement.
Concurrent private placement: In a concurrent private placement, we are selling to the purchasers of common stock in this offering warrants to purchase up to 100% of the number of shares of our common stock purchased by such investors in this offering, or up to 1,680,000 warrants. We will receive gross proceeds from the concurrent private placement transaction solely to the extent such warrants are exercised for cash. The warrants will be exercisable beginning on April 15, 2019 at an exercise price of $2.20 per share and will expire five (5) years from the earlier of the date on which the shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants may be sold pursuant to an effective registration statement or may be exercised on a cashless basis and be immediately sold pursuant to Rule 144. The warrants and the shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of the warrants are not being offered pursuant to this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus and are being offered pursuant to the exemption provided in Section 4(a)(2) under the Securities Act and Rule 506(b) of Regulation D promulgated thereunder. See “Private Placement Transaction and Warrants” beginning on page S-14 of this prospectus supplement.
Transfer agent and registrar: VStock Transfer, LLC
Risk factors: Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. For a discussion of factors you should consider carefully before deciding to invest in our shares of common stock, see the information contained in or incorporated by reference under the heading “Risk Factors” beginning on page S-6 of this prospectus supplement, on page 3 of the accompanying prospectus, and in the other documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement.
NASDAQ Capital Market Symbol: GLG

(1) The number of shares of our common stock to be outstanding immediately after this offering is based on 5,526,992 shares of common stock outstanding as of April 11, 2019, and excludes, as of such date, 1,680,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants offered in the simultaneous private placement and 16,000 shares of the Company’s common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants offered in a registered direct offering in December 2017 with an exercise price of $21.00.

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RISK FACTORS

Before you make a decision to invest in our securities, you should consider carefully the risks described below, together with other information in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the information incorporated by reference herein and therein. If any of the following events actually occur, our business, operating results, prospects or financial condition could be materially and adversely affected. This could cause the trading price of our common stock to decline and you may lose all or part of your investment. The risks described below are not the only ones that we face. Additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also significantly impair our business operations and could result in a complete loss of your investment.

RISKS RELATED TO THIS OFFERING

Since our management will have broad discretion in how we use the proceeds from this offering, we may use the proceeds in ways with which you disagree.

Our management will have significant flexibility in applying the net proceeds of this offering. You will be relying on the judgment of our management with regard to the use of these net proceeds, and you will not have the opportunity, as part of your investment decision, to influence how the proceeds are being used. It is possible that the net proceeds will be invested in a way that does not yield a favorable, or any, return for us. The failure of our management to use such funds effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results and cash flow.

Because we are a small company, the requirements of being a public company, including compliance with the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Act, may strain our resources, increase our costs and distract management, and we may be unable to comply with these requirements in a timely or cost-effective manner.

As a public company with listed equity securities, we must comply with the federal securities laws, rules and regulations, including certain corporate governance provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) and the Dodd-Frank Act, related rules and regulations of the SEC and the NASDAQ, with which a private company is not required to comply. Complying with these laws, rules and regulations occupies a significant amount of the time of our Board of Directors and management and significantly increases our costs and expenses. Among other things, we must:

maintain a system of internal control over financial reporting in compliance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the related rules and regulations of the SEC and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board;

comply with rules and regulations promulgated by the NASDAQ;

prepare and distribute periodic public reports in compliance with our obligations under the federal securities laws;

maintain various internal compliance and disclosures policies, such as those relating to disclosure controls and procedures and insider trading in our common stock;

involve and retain to a greater degree outside counsel and accountants in the above activities;

maintain a comprehensive internal audit function; and

maintain an investor relations function.

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Future sales of our common stock, whether by us or our stockholders, could cause our stock price to decline.

If our existing shareholders sell, or indicate an intent to sell, substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market, the trading price of our common stock could decline significantly. Similarly, the perception in the public market that our shareholders might sell shares of our common stock could also depress the market price of our common stock. A decline in the price of shares of our common stock might impede our ability to raise capital through the issuance of additional shares of our common stock or other equity securities. In addition, the issuance and sale by us of additional shares of our common stock or securities convertible into or exercisable for shares of our common stock, or the perception that we will issue such securities, could reduce the trading price for our common stock as well as make future sales of equity securities by us less attractive or not feasible. The sale of shares of common stock issued upon the exercise of our outstanding options and warrants could further dilute the holdings of our then existing shareholders.

Investors in this offering will experience immediate and substantial dilution.

Because the price per share of our common stock being offered is substantially higher than the net tangible book value per share of our common stock, you will suffer substantial dilution in the net tangible book value of our common stock. Based on an offering price of $2.20 per share, after deducting estimated offering commissions and expenses, and based on our net tangible book value of the common stock per share as of December 31, 2018, if you purchase shares of our common stock in this offering, you will suffer immediately dilution of $1.09 per share in the net tangible book value of the common stock.

Securities analysts may not cover our common stock and this may have a negative impact on the market price of our common stock.

The trading market for our common stock will depend, in part, on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. We do not have any control over independent analysts (provided that we have engaged various non-independent analysts). We do not currently have and may never obtain research coverage by independent securities and industry analysts. If no independent securities or industry analysts commence coverage of us, the trading price for our common stock would be negatively impacted. If we obtain independent securities or industry analyst coverage and if one or more of the analysts who covers us downgrades our common stock, changes their opinion of our shares or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of us or fails to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our common stock could decrease and we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause our stock price and trading volume to decline.

You may experience future dilution as a result of future equity offerings or other equity issuances.

We may in the future issue additional shares of our common stock or other securities convertible into or exchangeable for shares of our common stock. We cannot assure you that we will be able to sell shares of our common stock or other securities in any other offering or other transactions at a price per share that is equal to or greater than the price per share paid by investors in this offering. The price per share at which we sell additional shares of our common stock or other securities convertible into or exchangeable for our common stock in future transactions may be higher or lower than the price per share in this offering.

The price of our common stock may be volatile or may decline, which may make it difficult for investors to resell shares of our common stock at prices they find attractive.

The trading price of our common stock may fluctuate widely as a result of a number of factors, many of which are outside our control. In addition, the stock market is subject to fluctuations in the share prices and trading volumes that affect the market prices of the shares of many companies. These broad market fluctuations could adversely affect the market price of our common stock. Among the factors that could affect our stock price are:

the perception of U.S. investors and regulators of U.S. listed Chinese companies;

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly operating results;

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changes in financial estimates by securities research analysts;

negative publicity, studies or reports;

changes in the economic performance or market valuations of other microcredit companies;

announcements by us or our competitors of acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments;
addition or departure of key personnel;

fluctuations of exchange rates between RMB and the U.S. dollar; and

general economic or political conditions in China.

actual or anticipated quarterly fluctuations in our operating results and financial condition, and, in particular, further deterioration of asset quality;

changes in revenue or earnings estimates or publication of research reports and recommendations by financial analysts;

failure to meet analysts’ revenue or earnings estimates;

speculation in the press or investment community;

strategic actions by us or our competitors, such as acquisitions or restructurings;

actions by institutional shareholders;

fluctuations in the stock price and operating results of our competitors;

general market conditions and, in particular, developments related to market conditions for the financial services industry;

proposed or adopted regulatory changes or developments;

anticipated or pending investigations, proceedings or litigation that involve or affect us; or

domestic and international economic factors unrelated to our performance.

The stock market has experienced significant volatility recently. As a result, the market price of our common stock may be volatile. In addition, the trading volume in our common stock may fluctuate more than usual and cause significant price variations to occur. The trading price of the shares of our common stock and the value of our other securities will depend on many factors, which may change from time to time, including, without limitation, our financial condition, performance, creditworthiness and prospects, future sales of our equity or equity related securities, and other factors identified above in “Forward-Looking Statements.”

Accordingly, the shares of our common stock that an investor purchases, whether in this offering or in the secondary market, may trade at a price lower than that at which they were purchased, and, similarly, the value of our other securities may decline. Current levels of market volatility are unprecedented. The capital and credit markets have been experiencing volatility and disruption for more than a year. In some cases, the markets have produced downward pressure on stock prices and credit availability for certain issuers without regard to those issuers’ underlying financial strength.

A significant decline in our stock price could result in substantial losses for individual shareholders and could lead to costly and disruptive securities litigation.

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Volatility in our Common Stock price may subject us to securities litigation.

The market for our Common Stock may have, when compared to seasoned issuers, significant price volatility and we expect that our share price may continue to be more volatile than that of a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. In the past, plaintiffs have often initiated securities class action litigation against a company following periods of volatility in the market price of its securities. We may, in the future, be the target of similar litigation. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and liabilities and could divert management’s attention and resources.

Our certificate of incorporation allows for our board to create new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders, which could adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

Our board of directors has the authority to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of preferred stock. Our board of directors has the authority to issue up to 1,000,000 shares of our preferred stock without further stockholder approval. As a result, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of preferred stock that would grant to holders the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock and the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock. In addition, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that has greater voting power than our common stock or that is convertible into our common stock, which could decrease the relative voting power of our common stock or result in dilution to our existing stockholders. Although we have no present intention to issue any additional shares of preferred stock or to create any additional series of preferred stock, we may issue such shares in the future.

There is no public market for the warrants.

There is no established public trading market for the warrants being offered in this concurrent private placement and we do not expect a market to develop. In addition, we do not intend to apply for listing of the warrants on any securities exchange or automated quotation system. Without an active market, investors in this offering may be unable to readily sell the warrants.

The warrants may be dilutive to holders of our common stock.

The ownership interest of the existing holders of our common stock will be diluted to the extent the warrants are exercised. The shares of our common stock underlying the warrants represented approximately 18.9% of our common stock outstanding as of April 15, 2019 (assuming that the total shares of common stock outstanding includes the 1,680,000 offered pursuant to this prospectus supplement and the 1,680,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants).

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that the net proceeds from this offering will be approximately $3.4million, after deducting the placement agent fees and the estimated offering expenses payable by us.

We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for improving our existing business, working capital and other general corporate purposes.

The amounts and timing of our use of proceeds will vary depending on a number of factors, including the amount of cash generated or used by our operations, and the rate of growth, if any, of our business. As a result, we will retain broad discretion in the allocation of the net proceeds of this offering. In addition, while we have not entered into any agreements, commitments or understandings relating to any significant transaction as of the date of this prospectus supplement, we may use a portion of the net proceeds to pursue acquisitions, joint ventures and other strategic transactions.

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants that we are offering in the current private placement unless and until such warrants are exercised. If the warrants are fully exercised for cash, we will receive additional proceeds of up to approximately $3.7 million.

Pending the final application of the net proceeds of this offering, we intend to invest the net proceeds of this offering in short-term, interest bearing, investment-grade securities.

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DILUTION

If you invest in our common stock, your interest will be diluted immediately to the extent of the difference between the public offering price per share and the adjusted net tangible book value per share of our common stock after this offering.

Our net tangible book value on December 31, 2018 was approximately $2.8 million, or $0.5578 per share. “Net tangible book value” is total assets minus the sum of liabilities and intangible assets. “Net tangible book value per share” is net tangible book value divided by the total number of shares outstanding.

After giving effect to the sale of our common stock in the aggregate amount of $3.7 million in this offering at an assumed offering price of $2.20 per share, and after deducting the placement agent fees and estimated offering expenses payable by us in connection with this offering and our concurrent private placement of warrants, our as adjusted net tangible book value as of December 31, 2018 would have been approximately $6.1 million, or approximately $0.9150 per common stock. This represents an immediate increase in net tangible book value of $0.3572 per share to our existing stockholders and an immediate decrease in net tangible book value of $1.0850 per share to investors participating in this offering. The following table illustrates this dilution per share to investors participating in this offering:

Assumed offering price per share $ 2.2
Net tangible book value per share as of December 31, 2018 $ 2,802,223
Dilution per share attributable to new investors $ 1.0850
Net tangible book value per share after giving effect to this offering $ 6,134,503
Increase per share to existing investors $ 0.3572

The above discussion and table are based on5,023,906 (post-split) shares outstanding as of December 31, 2018 and exclude:

1,680,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants offered in the simultaneous private placement;

16,000 shares of the Company’s common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants offered in a registered direct offering in December 2017 with an exercise price of $21.00.

To the extent that any of our outstanding options or warrants are exercised, we grant additional options or other awards under our stock incentive plan or issue additional warrants, or we issue additional common stock in the future, there may be further dilution.

S-9

DIVIDEND POLICY

We did not declare or pay any dividend in 2018 and do not plan to do so in the foreseeable future. Although we intend to retain our earnings, if any, to finance the growth of our business, our board of directors will have the discretion to declare and pay dividends in the future, subject to applicable PRC regulations and restrictions as described below. Payment of dividends in the future will depend upon our earnings, capital requirements, and other factors, which our board of directors may deem relevant.

In addition, due to various restrictions under PRC laws on the distribution of dividends by WFOE, we may not be able to pay dividends to our stockholders. The Wholly-Foreign Owned Enterprise Law (1986), as amended, and The Wholly-Foreign Owned Enterprise Law Implementing Rules (1990), as amended, and the Company Law of the PRC (2006), contain the principal regulations governing dividend distributions by wholly foreign owned enterprises. Under these regulations, wholly foreign owned enterprises may pay dividends only out of their accumulated profits, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. Additionally, such companies are required to set aside a certain amount of their accumulated profits each year, if any, to fund certain reserve funds until such time as the accumulated reserve funds reach and remain above 50% of the registered capital amount. These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of liquidation and cannot be used for working capital purposes. Furthermore, if our subsidiaries and affiliates in China incur debt on their own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other payments. If we or our subsidiaries and affiliates are unable to receive all of the revenues from our operations through the current contractual arrangements, we may be unable to pay dividends on our common stock.

S-10

CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our capitalization as of December 31, 2018:

on an actual basis; and

on an as adjusted basis to give effect to the issuance and sale of 1,680,000 shares of common stock at the offering price of $2.20 per share, after deducting placement agent fees and expenses and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

As of December 31,
2018
Actual As adjusted
(in thousands of $)
Cash and Cash Equivalents 1,484 4,816
Total Current Liabilities 409 409
Shareholders’ equity:
Series A Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized; none issued. - -
Series B Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized; none issued. - -
Common stock, $0.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized, 5,526,992 shares issued and outstanding, and actual, and  6,626,863 shares outstanding, as adjusted, respectively $ 5 $ 7
Additional Paid in Capital* $ 28,765 $ 30,400
Accumulated deficit (25,457 ) (25,457 )
Total shareholders’ equity $ 2,802 $ 6,134
Total capitalization $ 3,211 $ 6,534

* Does not include any potential proceeds from the exercise of warrants issued in the simultaneous private placement at an exercise price of $2.20 per share.

The number of issued and outstanding shares as of December 31, 2018 in the table above excludes, as of such date, the following:

1,680,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants offered in the simultaneous private placement.

16,000 shares of the Company’s common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants offered in a registered direct offering in December 2017 with an exercise price of $21.00.

S-11

DESCRIPTION OF OUR SECURITIES WE ARE OFFERING

We are offering 1,680,000 shares of our common stock pursuant to this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. The material terms and provisions of our common stock are described under the caption “Descriptions of Capital Stock” beginning on page S-26 of the accompanying prospectus.

PRIVATE PLACEMENT TRANSACTION OF WARRANTS

Concurrently with the sale of common stock in this offering, we shall issue and sell to the investors in this offering warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 1,680,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price equal to $2.20 per share (the “Warrants”).  Each Warrant shall be exercisable beginning on April 15, 2019 and will expire five (5) years from the earlier of the date on which the shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the Warrants may be sold pursuant to an effective registration statement or may be exercised on a cashless basis and be immediately sold pursuant to Rule 144.

If, at any time while the Warrants are outstanding: (1) we consolidate or merge with or into another entity in which the Company is not the surviving entity; (2) we sell, lease, assign, convey or otherwise transfer all or substantially all of our assets; (3) any tender offer or exchange offer (whether completed by us or a third party) is completed pursuant to which holders of a majority of our outstanding shares of common stock tender or exchange their shares for securities, cash or other property; (4) we effect any reclassification of our shares of common stock or compulsory share exchange pursuant to which outstanding shares of common stock are converted or exchanged for other securities, cash or property; or (5) any transaction is consummated whereby any person or entity acquires more than 50% of our outstanding shares of common stock (each, a “Fundamental Transaction”), then upon any subsequent exercise of a Warrant, the holder thereof will have the right to receive the same amount and kind of securities, cash or other property as it would have been entitled to receive upon the occurrence of such Fundamental Transaction if it had been, immediately prior to such Fundamental Transaction, the holder of the number of shares then issuable upon exercise of the Warrant.

If, at any time while the Warrants are outstanding, we declare or make any dividend or other distribution of our assets (or rights to acquire our assets) to holders of our common stock, by way of return of capital or otherwise, then each holder of a Warrant shall be entitled to participate in such distribution to the same extent that the holder would have participated therein if the holder had held the number of shares of common stock acquirable upon complete exercise of the Warrant immediately prior to the record date for such distribution.

If at any time while the Warrants are outstanding, the closing price of our common stock on the Nasdaq Capital Market or other principal market on which it is traded equals or exceeds 300% of the purchase price per share of common stock in this offering (or $6.60 per share) (which amount may be adjusted for certain capital events, such as stock splits, as described in the Warrants) for twenty (20) consecutive trading days, then we shall have the right to require the holders to exercise for cash, all or any portion of their Warrants that have not been exercised on the mandatory exercise date specified in the notice that we shall provide to such holders into fully paid, validly issued and nonassessable shares of common stock in accordance with the terms of the Warrants.

The Warrants and the shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the Warrants will be issued and sold without registration under the Securities Act, or state securities laws, in reliance on the exemptions provided by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and/or Regulation D promulgated thereunder and in reliance on similar exemptions under applicable state laws. Accordingly, the investors may exercise the Warrants and sell the underlying shares of common stock only pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act covering the resale of those shares, an exemption under Rule 144 under the Securities Act, or another applicable exemption under the Securities Act.

S-12

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

Pursuant to a placement agent agreement dated February 25, 2019, we have engaged Maxim Group LLC, or the placement agent, to act as our exclusive placement agent in connection with this offering of our common stock pursuant to this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. Under the terms of the placement agent agreement, the placement agent has agreed to be our exclusive placement agent, on a commercially reasonable best efforts basis, in connection with the issuance and sale by us of our common stock in this takedown from our shelf registration statement. The terms of this offering were subject to market conditions and negotiations between us, the placement agent and prospective investors. The placement agent agreement does not give rise to any commitment by the placement agent to purchase any of our common stock or the Warrants, and the placement agent will have no authority to bind us by virtue of the placement agent agreement. Further, the placement agent does not guarantee that it will be able to raise new capital in any prospective offering.

We are entering into securities purchase agreements directly with investors in connection with this offering, and we will only sell to investors who have entered into securities purchase agreements.

We expect to deliver the shares of common stock being offered pursuant to this prospectus supplement, as well as the Warrants offered in the concurrent private placement, on or about April 15, 2019, subject to customary closing conditions.

We have agreed to pay the placement agent a total cash fee equal to 7% of the gross proceeds of this offering. We have agreed to reimburse the placement agent for all travel and other out-of-pocket expenses, including the reasonable fees, costs and disbursements of its legal fees which shall be limited to, in the aggregate, $90,000. We have paid the placement agent an advance of $25,000 (the “Advance”), which shall be applied to the out-of-pocket accountable expense. Any portion of the Advance not used shall be returned to us to the extent not actually incurred. We estimate our total expenses associated with the offering, excluding placement agent fees and expenses, will be approximately $348,720.

The following table shows per share and total cash placement agent’s fees we will pay to the placement agent in connection with the sale of the shares of common stock pursuant to this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus assuming the purchase of all of the shares of common stock offered hereby:

Per Share Total
Offering price $ 2.20 $ 3,696,000
Placement agent fees $ 0.154 $ 258,720
Proceeds, before expenses, to us $ 2.046 $ 3,437,280

After deducting certain fees and expenses due to the placement agent and our estimated offering expenses, we expect the net proceeds from this offering to be approximately $3.4 million.

Right of Participation

In the event the offering is consummated, we have agreed to grant the placement agent a right of participation for a period of twelve (12) months from the commencement of the sales of the Offering (the “Tail Period”) to act as lead managing underwriter and lead left book runner or minimally as a co-lead manager and co-lead left book runner and/or co-lead left placement agent with at least 75.0% of the economics for any and all future equity, equity-linked or debt (excluding commercial bank debt) offerings undertaken during the Tail Period by the Company or any subsidiary of the Company.

S-13

Indemnification

We have agreed to indemnify the placement agent and specified other persons against certain civil liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, and to contribute to payments that the placement agent may be required to make in respect of such liabilities.

The placement agent may be deemed to be an underwriter within the meaning of Section 2(a)(11) of the Securities Act, and any commissions received by it, and any profit realized on the resale of the shares of common stock and warrants sold by it while acting as principal, might be deemed to be underwriting discounts or commissions under the Securities Act. As an underwriter, the placement agent would be required to comply with the Securities Act and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or Exchange Act, including without limitation, Rule 10b-5 and Regulation M under the Exchange Act. These rules and regulations may limit the timing of purchases and sales of shares of common stock and warrants by the placement agent acting as principal. Under these rules and regulations, the placement agent:

may not engage in any stabilization activity in connection with our securities; and

may not bid for or purchase any of our securities, or attempt to induce any person to purchase any of our securities, other than as permitted under the Exchange Act, until it has completed its participation in the distribution in the securities offered by this prospectus supplement.

Relationships

The placement agent and its affiliates may have provided us and our affiliates in the past and may provide from time to time in the future certain commercial banking, financial advisory, investment banking and other services for us and such affiliates in the ordinary course of their business, for which they have received and may continue to receive customary fees and commissions. In addition, from time to time, the placement agent and its affiliates may effect transactions for their own account or the account of customers, and hold on behalf of themselves or their customers, long or short positions in our debt or equity securities or loans, and may do so in the future. However, except as disclosed in this prospectus supplement, we have no present arrangements with the placement agent for any further services.

Transfer Agent and Registrar

The transfer agent and registrar for our common stock is V Stock Transfer, LLC located at 18 Lafayette Place, Woodmere, NY 11598. Our transfer agent’s phone number is (212)828-8436.

Listing

Our shares of common stock are quoted on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the trading symbol “GLG.”

S-14

LEGAL MATTERS

Certain legal matters governed by the laws of the State of Delaware with respect to the validity of the offered securities will be passed upon for us by Hunter Taubman Fischer & Li, LLC, New York, New York. Loeb & Loeb LLP, New York, New York, is counsel to the placement agent in connection with this offering.

EXPERTS

The consolidated financial statements of our Company appearing in our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018 have been audited BDO China Shu Lun Pan Certified Public Accountants LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as set forth in the reports thereon included therein and incorporated herein by reference. Such consolidated financial statements are incorporated herein by reference in reliance upon such reports given on the authority of such firms as experts in accounting and auditing.

INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE

We incorporate by reference into this prospectus supplement the filed documents listed below, except as superseded, supplemented or modified by this prospectus supplement:

our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, filed with the SEC on April 5, 2019;

our Current Reports on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 16, 2019 and February 8, 2019;

Definitive Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed with the SEC on March 16, 2018; and

the description of the Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share, contained in the Registrant’s registration statement on Form 8-A(File No. 001-36055) filed with the Commission on August 12, 2013, pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act and all amendments or reports filed by us for the purpose of updating those descriptions.

We also incorporate by reference all additional documents that we file with the SEC pursuant to Sections 13(a), 13(c), 14 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act that are filed after the filing date of the registration statement of which this prospectus supplement is a part and prior to effectiveness of that registration statement. We are not, however, incorporating, in each case, any documents or information that we are deemed to “furnish” and not file in accordance with SEC rules.

You may obtain a copy of these filings, without charge, by writing or calling us at:

China Bat Group, Inc.

Room 104, No. 33 Section D,

No. 6 Middle Xierqi Road,

Haidian District, Beijing, China

+86 (010) 59441080

Attn: Investor Relations

You should rely only on the information incorporated by reference or provided in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus. We have not authorized anyone else to provide you with different information. You should not assume that the information in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the front page of those documents.

DISCLOSURE OF COMMISSION POSITION ON
INDEMNIFICATION FOR SECURITIES LAW VIOLATIONS

Under Section 145 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, the Company has broad powers to indemnify its directors and officers against liabilities they may incur in such capacities, including liabilities under the Securities Act. The Company’s Bylaws provide that the Company will indemnify its directors and officers to the fullest extent permitted by Delaware law. The Bylaws require the Company to advance litigation expenses in the case of stockholder derivative actions or other actions, against an undertaking by the directors and officers to repay such advances if it is ultimately determined that the directors and officers are not entitled to indemnification. The Bylaws further provide that rights conferred under such Bylaws shall not be deemed to be exclusive of any other right such persons may have or acquire under any agreement, vote of stockholders or disinterested directors, or otherwise. The Company believes that indemnification under its Bylaws covers at least negligence and gross negligence.

S-15

In addition our certificate of incorporation contains provisions which states that the Company shall, to the fullest extent permitted by Section 145 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware, as the same may be amended and supplemented, indemnify any and all persons whom it shall have power to indemnify under said section from and against any and all of the expenses, liabilities or other matters referred to in or covered by said section. The Company shall advance expenses to the fullest extent permitted by said section. Such right to indemnification and advancement of expenses shall continue as to a person who has ceased to be a director, officer, employee or agent and shall inure to the benefit of the heirs, executors and administrators of such a person. The indemnification and advancement of expenses provided for herein shall not be deemed exclusive of any other rights to which those seeking indemnification or advancement of expenses may be entitled under any By-Law, agreement, vote of stockholder or disinterested directors or otherwise.

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to our directors, officers or controlling persons, we have been advised that in the opinion of the SEC this indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is, therefore, unenforceable.

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

We have filed a registration statement with the SEC under the Securities Act with respect to the shares of common stock offered by this prospectus supplement. This prospectus supplement is part of that registration statement and does not contain all the information included in the registration statement.

For further information with respect to our shares of common stock and us, you should refer to the registration statement, its exhibits and the material incorporated by reference therein. Portions of the exhibits have been omitted as permitted by the rules and regulations of the SEC. Statements made in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus as to the contents of any contract, agreement or other document referred to are not necessarily complete. In each instance, we refer you to the copy of the contracts or other documents filed as an exhibit to the registration statement, and these statements are hereby qualified in their entirety by reference to the contract or document.

The registration statement may be inspected and copied at the public reference facilities maintained by the Securities and Exchange Commission at Room 1024, Judiciary Plaza, 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549 and the Regional Offices of the SEC located in the Citicorp Center, 500 West Madison Street, Suite 1400, Chicago, Illinois 60661, and at 233 Broadway, New York, New York 10279. Copies of those filings can be obtained from the SEC’s Public Reference Section, Judiciary Plaza, 100 F Fifth Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549 at prescribed rates and may also be obtained from the web site that the Securities and Exchange Commission maintains at http://www.sec.gov. You may also call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for more information. We file annual, quarterly and current reports and other information with the SEC. You may read and copy any reports, statements or other information on file at the SEC’s public reference room in Washington, D.C. You can request copies of those documents upon payment of a duplicating fee, by writing to the SEC.

S-16

PROSPECTUS

CHINA COMMERCIAL CREDIT, INC.

$30,000,000

Common Stock

Preferred Stock

Debt Securities

Warrants

Rights

Units

We may from time to time, in one or more offerings at prices and on terms that we will determine at the time of each offering, sell common stock, preferred stock, warrants, or a combination of these securities, or units, for an aggregate offering price of up to $30 million. This prospectus describes the general manner in which our securities may be offered using this prospectus. Each time we offer and sell securities, we will provide you with a prospectus supplement that will contain specific information about the terms of that offering. Any prospectus supplement may also add, update, or change information contained in this prospectus. You should carefully read this prospectus and the applicable prospectus supplement as well as the documents incorporated or deemed to be incorporated by reference in this prospectus before you purchase any of the securities offered hereby. This prospectus may not be used to offer and sell securities unless accompanied by a prospectus supplement.

Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “CCCR.”  On July 11, 2017, the last reported sales price of our common stock was $3.11.  We will apply to list any shares of common stock sold by us under this prospectus and any prospectus supplement on the NASDAQ Capital Market. The prospectus supplement will contain information, where applicable, as to any other listing of the securities on the NASDAQ Capital Market or any other securities market or exchange covered by the prospectus supplement.

As of July 11, 2017, the aggregate market value of our outstanding common stock held by non-affiliates is $54,062,464.2, based on 17,383,429 shares of outstanding common stock, of which approximately 14,073,654 shares are held by non-affiliates, and a per share price of $3.11 based on the closing sale price of our common stock on July 11, 2017.

During the 12 calendar month period ended July 12, 2017, 3,124,025 sharesof the common stock of the Company have been offered.

Pursuant to General Instruction I.B.6 of Form S-3, in no event will we sell our common stock in a public primary offering with a value exceeding more than one-third of our public float in any 12-month period so long as our public float remains below $75 million. We have not offered any securities pursuant to General Instruction I.B.6 of Form S-3 during the 12 calendar months prior to and including the date of this prospectus.

Investing in any of our common stock involves risk.  You should carefully consider the Risk Factors beginning on page 3of this prospectus in addition to Risk Factors contained in the applicable prospectus supplement, before you make an investment in the securities.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus if truthful or complete.  Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

We may offer the securities directly or through agents or to or through underwriters or dealers. If any agents or underwriters are involved in the sale of the securities their names, and any applicable purchase price, fee, commission or discount arrangement between or among them, will be set forth, or will be calculable from the information set forth, in an accompanying prospectus supplement. We can sell the securities through agents, underwriters or dealers only with delivery of a prospectus supplement describing the method and terms of the offering of such securities.  See “Plan of Distribution.”

The date of this prospectus is July 12, 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY 1
RISK FACTORS 3
DISCLOSURE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION 25
USE OF PROCEEDS 25
DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STOCK AN SECURITIES WE MAY OFFER 26
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION 33
LEGAL MATTERS 35
EXPERTS 35
WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 35
INFORMATION INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE 35

You should rely only on the information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus and any prospectus supplement. We have not authorized any dealer, salesman or any other person to provide you with additional or different information. This prospectus and any prospectus supplement are not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any securities other than the securities to which they relate and are not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy securities in any jurisdiction to any person to whom it is unlawful to make an offer or solicitation in that jurisdiction.  You should not assume that the information in this prospectus or any prospectus supplement or in any document incorporated by reference in this prospectus or any prospectus supplement is accurate as of any date other than the date of the document containing the information. We will disclose any material changes in our affairs in a post-effective amendment to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part, a prospectus supplement, or a future filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission incorporated by reference in this prospectus.

i

Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

The information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K includes some statements that are not purely historical and that are “forward-looking statements.” Such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding our company and our management’s expectations, hopes, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future, including our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. The words “anticipates,” “believes,” “continue,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plans,” “possible,” “potential,” “predicts,” “projects,” “seeks,” “should,” “will,” “would” and similar expressions, or the negatives of such terms, may identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking.

The forward-looking statements contained herein are based on current expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and the potential effects on us. Future developments actually affecting us may not be those anticipated. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties (some of which are beyond our control) or other assumptions that may cause actual results or performance to be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Examples are statements regarding future developments with respect to the following:

Our ability to improve internal controls and procedures;
Our ability to develop and market our microcredit lending and guarantee business in the future;
Our ability to effectively control the lending risk and collect from default borrowers;
Our ability to make timely adjustment to ensure adequate loan loss and financial guarantee provisions;
Inflation and fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;
Our on-going ability to obtain all mandatory and voluntary government and other industry certifications, approvals, and/or licenses to conduct our business;
Development of a liquid trading market for our securities; and
The costs we may incur in the future from complying with current and future governmental regulations and the impact of any changes in the regulations on our operations.

You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. The events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements may not be achieved or occur. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Moreover, neither we nor any other person assume responsibility for the accuracy and completeness of the forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason after the date of this report to conform these statements to actual results or to changes in our expectations.

We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements. The Company assumes no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements for any reason, except as required by law.

ii

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This prospectus is part of a registration statement that we filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, using a “shelf” registration process. Under this shelf registration process, we may sell any combination of the securities described in this prospectus in one of more offerings up to a total dollar amount of proceeds of $30,000,000. This prospectus describes the general manner in which our securities may be offered by this prospectus. Each time we sell securities, we will provide a prospectus supplement that will contain specific information about the terms of that offering. The prospectus supplement may also add, update or change information contained in this prospectus or in documents incorporated by reference in this prospectus. The prospectus supplement that contains specific information about the terms of the securities being offered may also include a discussion of certain U.S. Federal income tax consequences and any risk factors or other special considerations applicable to those securities. To the extent that any statement that we make in a prospectus supplement is inconsistent with statements made in this prospectus or in documents incorporated by reference in this prospectus, you should rely on the information in the prospectus supplement.

You should carefully read both this prospectus and any prospectus supplement together with the additional information described under “Where You Can Find Additional Information” before buying any securities in this offering.

The terms “we,” “us,” “our,” and the “Company” refer only to China Commercial Credit, Inc. (“CCC”) and its subsidiaries, unless the context suggests otherwise. Additionally, unless we indicate otherwise, references in this prospectus to:

“China” and the “PRC” are to the People’s Republic of China, excluding, for the purposes of this prospectus only, Taiwan and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau;
“RMB” and “Renminbi” are to the legal currency of China; and
“$,” “US$” and “U.S. dollars” are to the legal currency of the United States.

The Company

China Commercial Credit, Inc., is a financial services firm operating in China. Our mission is to fill the significant void in the market place by offering lending, financial guarantee and financial leasing products and services to a target market which has been significantly under-served by the traditional Chinese financial community. Our current operations consist of providing direct loans, loan guarantees and financial leasing services to small-to-medium sized businesses (“SMEs”), farmers and individuals in the city of Wujiang, Jiangsu Province.

Our loan and loan guarantee business is conducted through Wujiang Luxiang, a fully licensed microcredit company which we control through our subsidiaries and certain contractual arrangements. Our financial leasing business is conducted through PFL, our wholly owned subsidiary. Historically, many SMEs and farmers have been borrowing at high interest rates from unregulated and often illegal lenders, referred to as “underground” lenders, to finance their operations and growth, contrary to the preferences of Chinese banking authorities. Such high interest rate borrowing makes it difficult for businesses to grow, and also exacerbates China’s concerns about inflation. By operating through licensed and regulated businesses, we seek to bridge the gap between Chinese state-owned and commercial banks that have not traditionally served the capital needs of SMEs and higher interest rate “underground” lenders.

Jiangsu, which is an eastern coastal province, has among the highest population density in China and is home to many of the world’s leading exporters of electronic equipment, chemicals and textiles. As a result, the city of Wujiang ranks as one of the most economically successful cities in China. The SMEs, both in Jiangsu and other provinces in China, have historically been an under-served segment of the Chinese banking market.

Since Wujiang Luxiang’s inception in October 2008, it has developed a large number of borrowers in Wujiang City. All of our loans are made from our sole office, located in Wujiang City. As of December 31, 2016, we have built a $58.5 million portfolio of direct loans to 111 borrowers and a total of $10.9 million in loan guarantees for 14 borrowers.

During 2015 and 2016, the microcredit companies in Wujiang area went through the most difficult time since their inceptions in 2008. Three of them went bankrupt while the remainder are struggling with high default rates due to the poor economic condition, especially the slow-down in the textile industry. The operations of Wujiang Luxiang were also affected. For the year ended December 31, 2016, we had a revenue of $2.2 million and a net loss of $2.0 million compared to a loss of $55.8 million and net loss of $61.3 million in 2015, a decrease of 104% and 97%, respectively. As a result of the deteriorating economic condition, we experienced a substantial increase in the amount of default loans in both our direct lending and guarantee business. The amount of underlying loans we guaranteed has been reduced by 6.5% to $10.9 million as of December 31, 2016 compared to $11.7 million as of December 31, 2015. As the rate of fees and commissions generated from the guarantee business has been decreasing, the Company decided that the revenue does not justify the default risks involved in the guarantee business, and therefore expects to further reduce the traditional guarantee business and hold off on pursuing the guarantee business to be provided via the Kaixindai Financing Services Jiangsu Co. Ltd (“Kaixindai”) platform as previously planned. Management may actively resume the guarantee business in the future if economic conditions improve.

1

Our financial leasing services are anticipated to be provided to a diverse base of customers, including textile and other manufacturing companies, railroads, port facilities, local bus, and rail companies and municipal governments. Customers will include existing clients of Wujiang Luxiang in addition to new clients. PFL, our wholly owned subsidiary, plans to provide leases on both new and used manufacturing equipment, medical devices, transportation vehicles and industrial equipment, purchased both domestically and from foreign suppliers, to meet its customer’s needs. As of the date of this Annual Report, PFL entered into two financial leasing agreements for an aggregate of $5.61 million in lease receivables. We do not currently have further funds to deploy in the financial leasing business and plan to hold off expansion of the leasing business until the economic environment improves.

Our principal executive offices are located at No. 1 Zhongying Commercial Plaza, Zhong Ying Road, Wujiang, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China, 215200. Our telephone number is: 86-0512 6396-0022.

Going Concern

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business are dependent on, among other things, the Company’s ability to operate profitably, to generate cash flows from operations, and to pursue financing arrangements to support its working capital requirements.

In the opinion of management, all adjustments (which include normal recurring adjustments) necessary to present a fair statement of the Company’s financial position as of December 31, 2016, its results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, and its cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, as applicable, have been made. The results of operations are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for the full fiscal year or any future periods.

The Company has suffered an accumulated deficit of US$70,234,656 as of December 31, 2016. In addition, the Company had a working capital (total consolidated current assets exceeding total consolidated current liabilities) of US$2,332,909, as of December 31, 2016. As of December 31, 2016, the Company had cash and cash equivalents of US$768,501, and total short-term borrowings of US$ nil.

These and other factors disclosed raise substantial doubt as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year from the date of this filing. Management believes that it has developed a liquidity plan, as summarized below, that, if executed successfully, will provide sufficient liquidity to meet the Company obligations for a reasonable period of time.

Financial Support

The Company is actively seeking other strategic investors with experience in lending business. If necessary, the shareholders of Wujiang Luxiang plans to contribute more capital into Wujiang Luxiang. These shareholders’ undertaking to contribute more capital is not legally binding. On June 8, 2016, the Company closed a private placement with a third-party individual investor to issue 2,439,025 common shares, at a price of US$0.41 per share, and raised US$1,000,000 therefrom. This transaction was at arm’s length. The shares shall be authorized for listing on the NASDAQ capital market, and the net proceeds of the sale of the shares shall be used by the Company for working capital and general corporate purpose. These issued and outstanding shares are deemed a permanent equity of the Company.

Improvement in Working Capital Management

In order to meet the capital needs for our continued operations, we continue to use our best effort to improve our collection of loan receivable and interest receivable. We engaged four law firms, Jiangsu Zhenyuzhen Law Firm, Jiangsu Tianbian Law Firm, Jiangsu Mingren Law Firm and He-Partners Law Firm to represent us in the legal proceedings against the borrowers and their counter guarantors. Among them, He-Partners Law Firm, is one of the largest law firms in Suzhou City.

While management believes that the measures in the liquidity plan will be adequate to satisfy its liquidity and cash flow requirements for the twelve months after the financial statements are available to be issued, there is no assurance that the liquidity plan will be successfully implemented. Failure to successfully implement the liquidity plan will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial position, and may materially adversely affect its ability to continue as a going concern.

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RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the following material risk factors and other information in this report. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects for growth could be seriously impacted. As a result, the trading price, if any, of our Common Stock could decline and you could lose part or all of your investment.

Risks Relating to Our Lending and Guarantee Business

The substantial and continuing losses, and significant operating expenses incurred in the past few years may cause us to be unable to pursue all of our operational objectives if sufficient financing and/or additional cash from revenues is not realized.

We have an accumulated deficit of US$70,234,656 as of December 31, 2016 and a working capital (total consolidated current assets exceeding total consolidated current liabilities) of US$2,332,909, as of December 31, 2016. Although we have previously been able to attract financing as needed, such financing may not continue to be available at all, or if available, on reasonable terms as required. Further, the terms of such financing may be dilutive to existing shareholders or otherwise on terms not favorable to existing shareholders or us. If we are unable to secure additional financing, as circumstances require, or do not succeed in meeting our sales objectives, we may be required to change or significantly reduce our operations or ultimately may not be able to continue our operations.

Our independent registered public accounting firm’s report contains an explanatory paragraph that expresses substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a “going concern.”

Because of our historical accumulated deficit in working capital, among others, our independent auditor has raised substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements contained elsewhere in this prospectus do not include any adjustments that might result from our inability to consummate this offering or our inability to continue as a going concern.

Our limited operating history makes it difficult to evaluate our business and prospects and we may not be able to adapt to the changing market condition.

Wujiang Luxiang commenced operations in October 2008 and has a limited operating history. It is difficult to evaluate our prospects, as we may not have sufficient experience in addressing the risks to which companies operating in new and rapidly evolving markets such as the microcredit industry, may be exposed. We will continue to encounter risks and difficulties that companies at a similar stage of development frequently experience, including the potential failure to:

timely respond to the liquidity changes driven by PBOC’s policy and manage the credit risk inherent to our loan and guarantee business;
obtain sufficient working capital and increase our registered capital to support expansion of our loan and guarantee portfolios;

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comply with any changes in the laws and regulations of the PRC or local province that may affect our lending operations;
expand our borrowers base;
collect from default borrowers;
maintain adequate control of default risks and expenses allowing us to realize anticipated revenue growth;
implement our customer development, risk management and acquisition strategies and adapt and modify them as needed;
integrate any future acquisitions; and
anticipate and adapt to changing conditions in the Chinese lending industry resulting from changes in government regulations, mergers and acquisitions involving our competitors, and other significant competitive and market dynamics.

As a matter of fact, for the year ended December 31, 2016, we had a revenue of $2.2 million and a net loss of $2.0 million compared to a loss of $55.8 million and net loss of $61.3 million in 2015, a decrease of 104% and 97%, respectively. If we are unable to address any or all of the foregoing risks, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

PRC regulation of loans to, and direct investments in, PRC entities by offshore holding companies and the unauthorized transfer of certain funds by our former chief executive officer have prevented us from using the entire proceeds from our initial public offering to increase the registered capital of Wujiang Luxiang.

As an offshore holding company with PRC subsidiaries, we may transfer funds to our PRC subsidiaries or finance our operating entity by means of loans or capital contributions. Any loans to our PRC subsidiaries, which are foreign-invested enterprises, cannot exceed statutory limits based on the difference between the amount of our investments and registered capital in such subsidiaries, and shall be registered with SAFE, State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or its local counterparts. Furthermore, any capital increase contributions we make to our PRC subsidiaries, which are foreign-invested enterprises, shall be approved by MOFCOM, Ministry of Commerce, or its local counterparts. The majority of the net proceeds from our initial public offering completed in August 2013, approximately $7 million, is intended to increase the registered capital of Wujiang Luxiang and therefore its corresponding lending and guarantee capacity. Approximately $5.6 million of the net proceeds have already been contributed to Wujiang Luxiang and approved as an increase of the registered capital of Wujiang Luxiang. An additional $1.4 million was supposed to be transferred from WFOE to Wujiang Luxiang to further increase its registered capital. $1.5 million of the proceeds was initially transferred to WFOE to be used for the registered capital requirements of WFOE. Due to the subsequent reduction of WFOE’s registered capital requirement from $10 million to $100,000, $100,000 was supposed to remain at WFOE to satisfy its new registered capital requirement and the remaining $1.4 million was supposed to be used to further increase the registered capital of Wujiang Luxiang. However, as previously reported by the Company, RMB 7 million (approximately $1.1 million) was transferred from the bank account of WFOE to the personal account of Mr. Huichun Qin, the Company’s former CEO and Chairman of the Board. The Company has not been able to recover the missing funds. The delay and potential failure to use the remaining IPO proceeds to increase Wujiang Luxiang’s registered capital, currently prevents us from further expanding Wujiang Luxiang’s business.

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Our current operations in China are geographically limited to the city of Wujiang.

In accordance with the PRC state and provincial laws and regulations with regard to microcredit companies, we are not allowed to make loans and provide guarantees to businesses and individuals located outside of the city of Wujiang. Our future growth opportunities depend on the growth and stability of the economy in the city of Wujiang. A downturn in the local economy or the implementation of local policies unfavorable to SMEs may cause a decrease in the demand for our loan or guarantee services and may negatively affect borrowers’ ability to repay their loans on a timely basis, both of which could have a negative impact on our profitability and business.

If the Jiangsu government subsidy we currently receive from the Jiangsu government for loans to farmers is not renewed, we would suffer a loss of revenues.

Pursuant to certain Jiangsu government policies on promotion of rural economic reform, the interest on loans to farmers is subsidized by the government. Therefore, we charge the farmers at an interest rate lower than that of loans to SME’s. A portion of the difference between the lower rate charged to farmers and the rate charged to SME’s is remitted to us annually by the Jiangsu government as a government subsidy. We also received other types of government subsidies from Jiangsu government which are, among other things, intended to incentivize microcredit companies to establish and maintain strict financial operation systems. Applicants for these subsidies are required to apply for such subsidies annually. The standards for granting this subsidy is presently flexible and the number of applicants applying for such subsidies varies from year to year. In addition, the amount of funds which will be available for the Jiangsu government to use for these government subsidies each year is uncertain and depend on the needs of microeconomic development of Jiangsu province, the government’s budget and other factors. In the event our application for such subsidy in the future is not granted or the funds we receive are reduced, we would suffer loss of revenues.

Changes in the interest rates and spread could have a negative impact on our revenues and results of operations.

Our revenues and financial condition are primarily dependent on interest income, which is the difference between interest earned from loans we provide and interest paid to the lines of credit we obtain from other financial institutions. A narrowing interest rate spread could adversely affect our earnings and financial conditions. If we are not able to control our funding costs or adjust our lending interest rate in a timely manner, our interest margin will decline. In addition, the interest rates we charge to the borrowers in our direct loan business are linked to the PBOC benchmark interest rate (the “PBOC Benchmark Rate”). The PBOC Benchmark Rate may fluctuate significantly due to changes in the PRC government’s monetary policy. Due to the restriction that our interest rate cannot be higher than three times the PBOC Benchmark Rate pursuant to certain Jiangsu banking regulations released in October 2012, if we have to reduce the interest rate we charge the borrowers to reflect the decrease of the PBOC Benchmark Rate, our interest rate spread will be negatively affected.

As a microcredit company, our business is subject to greater credit risks than larger lenders, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

There are inherent risks associated with our lending and guarantee activities, including credit risk, which is the risk that borrowers may not repay the outstanding loans balances in our direct loan business or that we may not recover the full amount of the payment we made to the lender in our guarantee business. As a microcredit company, we extend credits to SMEs, farmer and individuals. These borrowers generally have fewer financial resources in terms of capital or borrowing capacity than larger entities and may have fewer financial resources to weather a downturn in the economy. Such borrowers may expose us to greater credit risks than lenders lending to larger, better-capitalized state-owned businesses with longer operating histories. Conditions such as inflation, economic downturn, local policy change, adjustment of industrial structure and other factors beyond our control may increase our credit risk more than such events would affect larger lenders. In addition, since we are only permitted to provide financial services to borrowers located in the city of Wujiang, our ability to geographically diversify our economic risks is limited by the local markets and economies. Also, decreases in local real estate value could adversely affect the values of the real property used as collateral in our direct loan and guarantee business. Such adverse changes in the local economy may have a negative impact on the ability of borrowers to repay their loans and the value of our collateral and our results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected.

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Our allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to absorb future losses or prevent a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Our risk assessment procedure uses historical information to estimate any potential losses based on our experience, judgment, and expectations regarding our borrowers and the economic environment in which we and our borrowers operate. The allowance for both loan losses and guarantee services were estimated based on 1% of the quarterly outstanding loan and guarantee portfolio balances. To the extent the mandatory loan loss reserve rate of 1% as required by PBOC differs from management’s estimates, the management elects to use the higher rate. We believe we are required to establish an allowance for loan losses pursuant to “The Guidance on Provisioning for Loan Losses” (the “Provision Guidance”) issued by PBOC and “Financial Practices of Rural Microcredit Companies of Jiangsu Province Pilot” (the “Jiangsu Financial Practices”) issued by Finance Office of Jiangsu Province in 2009. However, our implementation of the measurements set forth in the Provision Guidance and the Jiangsu Financial Practices, especially the Five-Tier approach in making the specific reserve, may be deemed not in compliance with the applicable banking regulations. Our loan loss reserves may not be sufficient to absorb future loan losses or prevent a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Increases to the provision for loan losses and provision on financial guarantee services will cause our net income to decrease.

Our business is subject to fluctuations based on local economic conditions. These fluctuations are neither predictable nor within our control and may have a material adverse impact on our operations and financial condition. We may decide to increase our provision for loan losses and provision on financial guarantee services in light of the borrower’s repayment ability and/or the lack of clarity in the applicable banking regulations with regard to microcredit companies. The regulatory authority may also require an increase in the provision for loan losses and provision on financial guarantee services or the recognition of further loan charge-offs, based on judgments different from those of our management. Any increase in the provision for loan losses and provision on financial guarantee services will result in a decrease in net income and may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We lack significant product and business diversification. Accordingly, our future revenues and earnings are more susceptible to fluctuations than a more diversified company.

Currently, our primary business activities include offering direct loans and providing guarantee services to our customers. If we are unable to maintain and grow the operating revenues from our business or develop additional revenue streams, our future revenues and earnings are not likely to grow and could decline. Our lack of significant product and business diversification could inhibit the opportunities for growth of our business, revenues and profits.

Competition in the microcredit industry is growing and could cause us to lose market share and revenues in the future.

We believe that the microcredit industry is an emerging market in China. We may face growing competition in the microcredit industry and we believe that the microcredit market is becoming more competitive as this industry matures and begins to consolidate. We currently compete with traditional financial institutions, other microcredit companies, and some cash-rich state-owned companies or individuals that lend to SMEs. Some of our competitors have larger and more established borrower bases and substantially greater financial, marketing and other resources than we do. As a result, we could lose market share and our revenues could decline, thereby adversely affecting our earnings and potential for growth.

If we fail to remediate the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting that have been identified, we may be unable to accurately report our results of operations or prevent misstatements, and investor confidence and the market price of our Common Stock may be materially and adversely affected.

Prior to our IPO, we were a private company with limited accounting personnel and other resources with which to address our internal controls and procedures. Our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to and has not conducted an audit or assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. In August 2014, the Company discovered RMB 7 million (approximately $1.1 million) was transferred (the “Transfer at Issue”) from the bank account of WFOE, without authorization, to the personal account of Mr. Qin, the then CEO of the Company. The Company appointed a special committee (the “Special Committee”) of the Board of Directors to conduct an internal review surrounding the Transfer at Issue. The internal review indicated that the Company’s control deficiencies contributed to the Transfer at Issue. Since Mr. Qin had the sole authority to approve fund transfers, there was a lack of checks and balances over transfers. The Company filed a report with a local Wujiang Police Department charging Mr. Qin with misappropriating RMB 7 million. The Company retained a local law firm to assist the Company in following up with the Police Department with regard to the development of the case and collection of the missing funds. According to the PRC counsel, if the prosecutors agree to criminally indict Mr. Qin, there will be an accompanying civil collection suit. If the prosecutors determined not to criminally indict Mr. Qin, then the Company will initiate a civil proceeding against Mr. Qin to collect such funds. The prosecutors have not notified the Company of their decision as of the date of this prospectus. There is no assurance that we would be able to collect the missing funds, if any.

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As a result of the control deficiencies in the fund transfer procedure and other material weaknesses identified, the Company concluded its internal controls over financial reporting were not effective as of December 31, 2014. See Item 9AControls and Proceduresfor a detailed discussion of the material weakness and the remediation measures the Company plans to take. Such material weaknesses may result in our inability to accurately report our financial results or prevent material misstatements.

Our business depends on the continuing efforts of members of our management. If we lose their services, our business may be severely disrupted.

Our business operations depend on the continuing efforts of members of our management. If one or more of our management were unable or unwilling to continue their employment with us, we might not be able to replace them in a timely manner, or at all. We may incur additional expenses to recruit and retain qualified replacements. Our business may be severely disrupted and our financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. In addition, members of our management team may join a competitor or form a competing company. We may not be able to successfully enforce any contractual rights we have with our management team, in particular in China, where all of these individuals reside and where our business is operated through Wujiang Luxiang through various VIE Agreements. As a result, our business may be negatively affected due to the loss of one or more members of our management.

We require highly qualified personnel and if we are unable to hire or retain qualified personnel, we may not be able to grow effectively.

Our future success also depends upon our ability to attract and retain highly qualified personnel. Expansion of our business and our management will require additional managers and employees with industry experience, and our success will be highly dependent on our ability to attract and retain skilled management personnel and other employees. We may not be able to attract or retain highly qualified personnel. Competition for skilled personnel is significant in China. This competition may make it more difficult and expensive to attract, hire and retain qualified managers and employees.

We have no insurance coverage for our lending or guarantee business or our bank accounts, which could expose us to significant costs and business disruption.

Risks associated with our business and operations include, but are not limited to, borrowers’ failure to repay the outstanding principal and interest when due and our loss reserve is not sufficient to cover such failure, losses of key personnel, business interruption due to power shortages or network failure, and risks posed by natural disasters including storms, floods and earthquakes, any of which may result in significant costs or business disruption. We do not maintain any credit insurance, business interruption insurance, general third-party liability insurance, nor do we maintain key-man life insurance or any other insurance coverage except the mandatory social insurance for the employees of Wujiang Luxiang. If we incur any loss that is not covered by our loss reserve, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

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We maintain our cash with various banks. Our cash accounts are not insured or otherwise protected. Should any bank or trust company holding our cash deposits become insolvent, or if we are otherwise unable to withdraw funds, we could lose the cash on deposit with that particular bank or trust company.

Risks Relating to Our Financial Leasing Business

We only generated a small amount of revenue from our financial leasing operations as of now and our financial leasing business plan may not be executed as planned.

We are currently at the initial stage of developing our financial leasing business. In February 2015, we signed two leasing contracts worth a total of total $4.88 million. The success of our financial leasing operations will highly depend upon our ability to obtain funds to deploy and successfully develop and market our financial leasing services to the targeted customers. We may not be able to develop our financial leasing business as planned and generate significant revenues. The revenue and income potential of our proposed financial leasing business is unproven and the lack of operating history makes it difficult to evaluate the future prospects of this business.

We have no experience in the equipment leasing and financing business and our knowledge of the Chinese financial leasing market is limited.

None of the PFL management has any prior experience in the operation or management of equipment financing and leasing. Our knowledge of the Chinese financial leasing industry and market is very limited. Our perception of the potential customers’ needs and their acceptance of our financial leasing services may not be accurate. We may not be able to work with equipment providers to successfully purchase qualified equipment identified by our customers on terms acceptable to us. We may not be able to establish sound financial modeling in the calculation of the interest rate and residual value. Such inexperience and lack of active knowledge may lead to failure of our financial leasing business.

Lack of knowledge of financial leasing benefits among potential customers may make it difficult for us to market our services.

Currently, a high proportion of Chinese management, especially management of SMEs, still perceive leasing companies as a “second-class bank”, and very few recognize the flexibility and benefits that financial leasing provides. We may need to invest a tremendous amount of time and effort toward lease education so that potential customers can fully appreciate the flexibility leasing offers to deploy their assets. Failure in such education may make it difficult for us to market our financial leasing services.

A protracted economic downturn may cause an increase in defaults under our leases and lower demand for the commercial equipment we lease.

A protracted economic downturn, similar to the one China experienced in recent years, could result in a decline in the demand for some of the types of equipment or services we finance, which could lead to a decline in originations. A protracted economic downturn may slow the development and continued operation of small commercial businesses, which is one of the primary markets for the commercial equipment leased by us. In addition, a protracted downturn could result in an increase in delinquencies and defaults by our lessees and other obligors, which could have an adverse effect on our cash flow and earnings. These factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our allowance for lease credit losses may prove to be inadequate to cover future credit losses.

We will maintain an allowance for credit losses on our leases, at an amount we believe is sufficient to provide adequate protection against losses on the leases. We cannot be sure that our allowance for credit losses will be adequate over time to cover losses caused by adverse economic factors, or unfavorable events affecting specific leases, industries or geographic areas. Losses in excess of our allowance for credit losses may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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We are vulnerable to changes in the demand for the types of equipment we plan on leasing or price reductions in such equipment.

Our leasing portfolio will be comprised of a wide variety of equipment including, but not limited to, public transportation vehicles such as subway cars, trains, buses, medical equipment, equipment used in textile production and agricultural equipment. Reduced demand for financing of the types of equipment we lease could adversely affect our lease origination volume, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Technological advances may lead to a decrease in the price of these types of equipment and a consequent decline in the need for financing of such equipment. These changes could reduce the need for outside financing sources that would reduce our lease financing opportunities and origination volume in such products. In the event that demand for financing the types of equipment that we lease declines, we will need to expand our efforts to provide lease financing for other products.

We may face growing competition, which could cause us to lower our lease rates, hurt our origination volume and strategic position and adversely affect our financial results.

The Chinese financial leasing industry is becoming competitive in recent years. We will compete for customers with a number of international, national, regional and local banks and finance companies and financial leasing companies. Our competitors also include equipment manufacturers that lease or finance the sale of their own products. Our competitors include larger, more established companies, some of which may possess substantially greater financial, marketing and operational resources than us, including lower cost of funds and access to capital markets and other funding sources which may be unavailable to us. If a competitor was to lower its lease rates, we could be forced to follow such trend or be unable to retain origination volume, either of which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If PFL were to lose key personnel, its operating results may suffer.

The success of our financial leasing business depends to a large extent upon the abilities and continued efforts of senior management. The loss of the services of one or more of the key members of our senior management before we are able to attract and retain qualified replacement personnel could have a material adverse effect on the development and success of our financial leasing business.

Recently proposed accounting changes may negatively impact the demand for equipment leases.

On August 17, 2010, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) released a joint exposure draft that would dramatically change lease accounting for both lessees and lessors by requiring balance sheet recognition of all leases. At their June 13, 2012 joint board meeting, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the FASB (collectively, the “Boards”) agreed on an approach for the accounting for lease expenses as part of their joint project to revise lease accounting. In September 2012, the Boards reached tentative decisions regarding sale and leaseback transactions and other lease accounting issues. The Boards issued revised exposure draft in May 2013, with a 120-day comment period. As part of the deliberation process, the Boards reviewed nearly 800 comment letters and held public roundtable meetings and preparer workshops. A key issue raised by stakeholders in this process was the front-loading of expense recognition for lessees in the proposal. The Boards have tentatively agreed to change the expense recognition pattern and income statement presentation for certain leases. If these accounting changes are adopted in a form that makes equipment leasing less attractive to small business owners, it could result in a reduction in the demand for equipment leases, and could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Risks Relating to Doing Business in China

PRC regulation of loans to, and direct investments in, PRC entities by offshore holding companies may delay or prevent us from using proceeds from financing activities to make loans or additional capital contributions to our PRC operating subsidiaries.

As an offshore holding company with PRC subsidiaries, we may transfer funds to our PRC subsidiaries or finance our operating entity by means of loans or capital contributions. Any loans to our PRC subsidiaries, which are foreign-invested enterprises, cannot exceed statutory limits based on the difference between the amount of our investments and registered capital in such subsidiaries, and shall be registered with SAFE, or its local counterparts. Furthermore, any capital increase contributions we make to our PRC subsidiaries, which are foreign-invested enterprises, shall be approved by MOFCOM, or its local counterparts. We may not be able to obtain these government registrations or approvals on a timely basis, if at all. If we fail to receive such registrations or approvals, our ability to provide loans or capital to increase contributions to our PRC subsidiaries may be negatively affected, which could adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

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A slowdown of the Chinese economy or adverse changes in economic and political policies of the PRC government could negatively impact China’s overall economic growth, which could materially adversely affect our business.

We are a holding company and all of our operations are entirely conducted in the PRC. Although the PRC economy has grown in recent years, such growth may not continue. A slowdown in overall economic growth, an economic downturn or recession or other adverse economic developments in the PRC may materially reduce the demand for our direct lending, guarantee and financial leasing services and may have a materially adverse effect on our business.

China’s economy differs from the economies of most other countries in many respects, including the amount of government involvement in the economy, the general level of economic development, growth rates and government control of foreign exchange and the allocation of resources. While the PRC economy has grown significantly over the past few decades, this growth has remained uneven across different periods, regions and economic sectors.

The PRC government also exercises significant control over China’s economic growth by allocating resources, controlling the payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies. Any actions and policies adopted by the PRC government could negatively impact the Chinese economy, which could materially adversely affect our business.

Substantial uncertainties and restrictions with respect to the political and economic policies of the PRC government and PRC laws and regulations could have a significant impact upon the business we may be able to conduct in the PRC and accordingly on the results of our operations and financial condition.

Our business operations may be adversely affected by the current and future political environment in the PRC. The Chinese government exerts substantial influence and control over the manner in which we must conduct our business activities. Our ability to operate in China may be adversely affected by changes in Chinese laws and regulations. Under the current government leadership, the government of the PRC has been pursuing economic reform policies that encourage private economic activities and greater economic decentralization. However, the government of the PRC may not continue to pursue these policies, or may significantly alter these policies from time to time without notice.

There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations, including, but not limited to, the laws and regulations governing our business, or the enforcement and performance of our arrangements with borrowers in the event of the imposition of statutory liens, death, bankruptcy or criminal proceedings. Only after 1979 did the Chinese government begin to promulgate a comprehensive system of laws that regulate economic affairs in general, deal with economic matters such as foreign investment, corporate organization and governance, commerce, taxation and trade, as well as encourage foreign investment in China. Although the influence of the law has been increasing, China has not developed a fully integrated legal system and recently enacted laws and regulations may not sufficiently cover all aspects of economic activities in China. Also, because these laws and regulations are relatively new, and because of the limited volume of published cases and their lack of force as precedents, interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations involve significant uncertainties. New laws and regulations that affect existing and proposed future businesses may also be applied retroactively. In addition, there have been constant changes and amendments of laws and regulations over the past 30 years in order to keep up with the rapidly changing society and economy in China. Because government agencies and courts provide interpretations of laws and regulations and decide contractual disputes and issues, their inexperience in adjudicating new business and new polices or regulations in certain less developed areas causes uncertainty and may affect our business. Consequently, we cannot clearly foresee the future direction of Chinese legislative activities with respect to either businesses with foreign investment or the effectiveness on enforcement of laws and regulations in China. The uncertainties, including new laws and regulations and changes of existing laws, as well as judicial interpretation by inexperienced officials in the agencies and courts in certain areas, may cause possible problems to foreign investors.

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Our microcredit business is subject to extensive regulation and supervision by state, provincial and local government authorities, which may interfere with the way we conduct our business and may negatively impact our financial results.

We are subject to extensive and complex state, provincial and local laws, rules and regulations with regard to our loan and guarantee operations, capital structure, allowance for loan losses, among other things. These laws, rules and regulations are issued by different central government ministries and departments, provincial and local governments while enforced by different local authorities in the city of Wujiang. In addition, it is not clear whether microcredit companies are subject to certain banking regulations the state-owned and commercial banks are subject to, including the regulation with regard to loan loss reserves. Therefore, the interpretation and implementation of such laws, rules and regulations may not be clear and occasionally we have to depend on oral inquiries with local government authorities. As a result of the complexity, uncertainties and constant changes in these laws, rules and regulation, including changes in interpretation and implementation of such, our business activities and growth may be adversely affected if we do not respond to the changes in a timely manner or are found to be in violation of the applicable laws, regulations and policies as a result of a different position from ours taken by the competent authority in the interpretation of such applicable laws, regulations and policies. If we were found to be not in compliance with these laws and regulations, we may be subject to sanctions by regulatory authorities, monetary penalties and/or reputation damage, which could have a material adverse effect on our business operation and profitability.

Lack of financial leasing regulations could negatively impact our business.

Currently, there is no uniform equipment title registration process and system in China, as each municipality adopts different procedures. The pending China Financial Leasing Law is expected to unify the registration procedures and protect the lessor against a “good-faith” third-party claim if the leased assets are registered in the lessor’s name. In the absence of such central title registration system, the lessors’ ownership interest on the leased equipment may be threatened. Loss of ownership to the leased equipment will have a negative effect on our financial position.

We may be subject to administrative sanctions in the event we are found to have charged excessive interest rates on some of the historical direct loans we extended.

During 2010, 2011 and 2012, we provided certain financing consulting services to an aggregate of approximately 114 individuals and companies and generated consulting fees of approximately US$693,555(RMB 4.6 million). According to the consulting arrangements we had with these parties, we agreed to provide consulting services such as advising on the applicable lending rules and regulations, making recommendations about financing plans, assisting the parties to complete and submit financing applications and providing general guidance in the capital raising process. Some of these clients were also borrowers. We also charged additional consulting fees when such borrowers asked to expedite the review and approval process of their loan applications, as such expedited lendings require funds to be allocated from other positions at an additional cost to us. The maximum interest rate a microcredit lender is allowed to charge on microcredit loans was four times the PBOC’s Benchmark Rate, according to Circular 23 and Several Opinion Regarding the Trial of Cases promulgated by Supreme Court of PRC. Although none of these loans had interest rates higher than four times the PBOC Benchmark Rate, the aggregate amount of interest we charged such borrower plus the consulting fee would exceed four times the PBOC Benchmark Rate if the consulting fees paid by these borrowers were deemed as additional interest payments. We believe such consulting fees were compensation payments for the consulting services we provided. Also we have stopped providing such consulting services since July 31, 2012 and we do not anticipate engaging in such consulting service in the foreseeable future. However, in the event the competent government authority determines these historical consulting fees werede facto interest payments, we may be found to have charged excessive rates on these loans and, as a result, we may be subject to sanctions by the government authority, which may include return of the excessive interest to affected borrowers, confiscation of illegal gains, fine, suspension of operation and/or revocation of our business license.

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We may be subject to administrative sanctions in the event the extension we obtained on contribution of PFL’s registered capital is reversed or determined to be not effective or if we are not able to contribute the remainder of the registered capital as required.

Pursuant to Foreign Wholly-Owned Enterprise Law and relevant implementation rules, 15% of the U.S. $50 million registered capital of PFL is required to be contributed within initial three months of PFL obtaining its business license on September 5, 2013 and the remainder to be contributed within two years after the business license is granted. We did not make any contributions within the three-month period since we expected to fund such contribution with the proceeds from the follow-on offering. Based on our oral inquiries with the local Commission of Commerce of Wujiang, we were told that the required initial installment would be reduced to 10% in 2014 and that the competent authority would refrain from taking specific administrative measures against us once the first installment of capital contribution is paid. In addition, we were told by Wujiang Economic and Technological Development Zone (“WETDZ”), where PFL is incorporated and located, that there will be no penalty for the delayed contribution of the first installment of the registered capital. In the event the orally granted extension or the advice we received from WETDZ is reversed or found to be not valid by a relevant authority, we may be subject to administrative sanctions, including monetary penalties ranging from 5% to 15% of the portion that has not been paid on time, or from $375,000 to $1,125,000 if none was contributed at the time of the sanction. In October 2014, we contributed substantially all of the net proceeds raised in the follow-on offering to the registered capital requirement of PFL.

In addition, the new PRC Company Law that became effective on March 1, 2014, radically changed the registered capital requirements, including deleting the requirement to contribute the registered capital within certain time frames and the minimum registered capital requirement. However, it is unclear whether PFL will be subject to the loosened registered capital requirements under the new PRC Company Law and, as a result, be exempted from contributing the remainder of the registered capital within two years after the business license is granted. If it is later determined that PFL cannot enjoy the loosened registered capital requirement set forth in the new Company Law, we would have to contribute 85% of the then registered capital of PFL prior to September 4, 2015. In the event we are not able to make such contribution, we may be subject to administrative sanctions, including monetary penalties ranging from 5% to 15% of the portion that has not been paid on time, or from $2,125,000 to $6,375,000 if none of the remaining 85% was contributed at the time of the sanction.

Since we conduct substantially all of our operations in China, and almost all of our officers and directors reside outside the United States, our stockholders may face difficulties in protecting their interests and exercising their rights as a stockholder of CCC.

Although we are incorporated in Delaware, we conduct substantially all of our operations in China through Wujiang Luxiang, our consolidated VIE in China and PFL. All of our current officers and almost all of our directors reside outside the United States and substantially all of the assets of those persons are located outside of the United States. It may be difficult for the stockholders to conduct due diligence on the Company or such directors in your election of the directors and attend shareholders meeting if the meeting is held in China. We plan to have one shareholder meeting each year at a location to be determined, potentially alternating between United States and China. As a result of all of the above, our public shareholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests through actions against our management, directors or major shareholders than would shareholders of a corporation doing business entirely or predominantly within the United States.

Stockholders may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments or bringing original actions in China based upon United States laws, including the federal securities laws or other foreign laws against us or our management.

Substantially all of our operations are conducted in China, and all of our assets are located in China. A majority of our officers are nationals or residents of the PRC and a substantial portion of their assets are located outside the United States. As a result, Dacheng Law Firm, our counsel as to PRC law, advised us that it may be difficult for a shareholder to effect service of process within the United States upon these persons, or to enforce judgments against us which are obtained in United States courts, including judgments predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States.

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Dacheng Law Firm further advised us that the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided for under the PRC Civil Procedures Law. PRC courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of the PRC Civil Procedures Law based either on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on principles of reciprocity between jurisdictions. China does not have any treaties or other form of reciprocity with the United States that provide for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. In addition, according to the PRC Civil Procedures Law, courts in the PRC will not enforce a foreign judgment against us or our directors and officers if they decide that the judgment violates the basic principles of PRC laws, national sovereignty, security or public interest. As a result, it is uncertain whether and on what basis a PRC court would enforce a judgment rendered by a court in the United States.

Dacheng Law Firm also advised us that in the event that shareholders originate an action against a company without domicile in China for disputes related to contracts or other property interests, the PRC courts may accept a course of action if (a) the disputed contract was concluded or performed in the PRC, or the disputed subject matter is located in the PRC, (b) the company (as defendant) has properties that can be seized within the PRC, (c) the company has a representative organization within the PRC, (d) the parties choose to submit to jurisdiction of the PRC courts in the contract, or (e) the contract is executed or performed within the PRC. The action may be initiated by the shareholder through filing a complaint with the PRC courts. The PRC courts will determine whether to accept the complaint in accordance with the PRC Civil Procedures Law. The shareholder may participate in the action by itself or entrust any other person or PRC legal counsel to participate on behalf of such shareholder. Foreign citizens and companies will have the same right as PRC citizens and companies in an action unless such foreign country restricts the rights of PRC citizens and companies.

We may have difficulty in establishing adequate management and financial controls in China.

The PRC has only recently begun to adopt the management and financial reporting concepts and practices that investors in the U.S. are familiar with. We may have difficulty in hiring and retaining employees in China who have the experience necessary to implement the kind of management and financial controls that are required of a U.S. public company. If we cannot establish such controls, or if we are unable to collect the financial data required for the preparation of our financial statements, or if we are unable to keep our books and accounts in accordance with the U.S. accounting standards for business, we may not be able to continue to file required reports with the SEC, which would likely have a material adverse effect on the performance of our shares of Common Stock.

WFOE’s ability to pay dividends to us may be restricted due to foreign exchange control and other regulations of China.

As an offshore holding company, we may rely principally on dividends from our subsidiaries in China, WFOE and PFL, for our cash requirements. Under the applicable PRC laws and regulations, foreign-invested enterprises in China may pay dividends only out of their accumulated profits, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. In addition, a foreign-invested enterprise in China is required to set aside a portion of its after-tax profit to fund specific reserve funds prior to payment of dividends. In particular, at least 10% of its after-tax profits based on PRC accounting standards each year is required to be set aside towards its general reserves until the accumulative amount of such reserves reach 50% of its registered capital. These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends.

Furthermore, WFOE’s and PFL’s ability to pay dividends may be restricted due to foreign exchange control policies and the availability of its cash balance. Substantially all of our operations are conducted in China and all of our revenue received, by WFOE through VIE arrangement and by PFL, are denominated in RMB. RMB is subject to exchange control regulation in China, and, as a result, WFOE and PFL may be unable to distribute any dividends outside of China due to PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert RMB into U.S. dollars.

The lack of dividends or other payments from WFOE may limit our ability to make investments or acquisitions that could be beneficial to our business, pay dividends or otherwise fund, and conduct our business. Our funds may not be readily available to us to satisfy obligations which have been incurred outside the PRC, which could adversely affect our business and prospects or our ability to meet our cash obligations. Accordingly, if we do not receive dividends from WFOE or PFL, our liquidity and financial condition will be materially and adversely affected.

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There is uncertainty in the preferential tax treatment we currently enjoy and financial subsidy commitment we expect to enjoy. Any change in the preferential tax treatment we currently enjoy in the PRC may materially adversely impact our net income.

Effective January 1, 2008, the New Enterprise Income Tax Law of PRC stipulates that domestically owned enterprises and foreign invested enterprises (the “FIEs”) are subject to a uniform income tax rate of 25%. While the New Enterprise Income Tax Law equalizes the income tax rates for FIEs and domestically owned enterprises, preferential tax treatment may continue to be given to companies in certain encouraged sectors and to entities classified as high-technology companies, regardless of whether these are domestically-owned enterprises or FIEs. Pursuant to the Jiangsu Document No. 132 issued in November 2009, microcredit companies in Jiangsu Province are subject to a preferential tax rate of 12.5%. As a result, Wujiang Luxiang has been subject to the preferential income tax rate of 12.5% since its inception in 2008. The taxation practice implemented by the tax authority governing our business from 2008 through 2011 was that we paid enterprise income taxes at a rate of 25% on a quarterly basis, and upon annual tax settlement done by the Company and the tax authority within five (5) months after December 31, the tax authority refunded us the excess enterprise income taxes we paid beyond the rate of 12.5% in tax credit. In 2013and 2012 the tax authority allowed us to pay enterprise income tax, on a monthly basis, at 12.5% for our income generated from our direct loan business and at 25% for income generated from our guarantee business. During the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2013, we paid an aggregate $2,191,329 for income tax. We received a refund of $985,332 in April 2014. The refund is the difference between actual income tax prepayment, which is made at 25% for income generated from both our direct loan business and our guarantee business, and the income tax expense, which is calculated at 12.5% for direct loan and 25% for our guarantee business. In addition, Wujiang Luxiang has been subject to business tax at the preferential rate of 3% since its inception in 2008.

In April 2012 Wujiang Luxiang received a notice from local tax authority, informing us that only income generated from Wujiang Luxiang’s direct loan business was qualified to enjoy a preferential income tax rate of 12.5% and business tax of 3% under the Jiangsu Document No. 132, but its taxable income arising from Wujiang’s other business such as the guarantee business was still subject to a standard tax rate of 25% for income tax and 5% for business tax. The local tax authority required Wujiang Luxiang to implement the above-mentioned policy starting with the tax filing for 2011 which was filed in April 2012, and the policy applies to all years thereafter. The impact of the changed policy on the income tax provision on the issued financial statements of 2011 was $225,445. However, we believe the underpayment was comparatively minimal as it only accounted for less than 3% of net income of 2011, thus it recorded the underpayment of $225,445 in the financial statements for financial year of 2012. There was no underpayment penalty assessed. Furthermore, such tax policy change may be applied retroactively to financial year of 2008, 2009 and 2010. Although we have not received any notice from local tax authority to request Wujiang Luxiang to make any underpayment with surcharge, there is no assurance that the local tax authority will not do so in the future.

There is a risk that the competent tax authority may decide that Wujiang Luxiang will not be eligible for the preferential tax rates for the direct loan business in the future. Moreover, the PRC government could eliminate any of these preferential tax treatments before their scheduled expiration. Expiration, reduction or elimination of such preferential tax treatments will increase our income tax expenses and in turn decrease our net income.

There is uncertainty in the policy at the state and provincial levels as to how the direct loan and guarantee businesses carried out by the microcredit companies shall be treated with regard to income tax and business tax. If the tax authority determines that the income tax, business tax or other applicable tax we previously paid were less than what was required, we may be requested to make payment for the overdue tax and interest on the overdue payment.

In addition, pursuant to an agreement PFL has with the WETDZ, PFL expects to receive a financial award equal to 100% of the portion of the enterprise income tax proceeds contributed by PFL that is reserved by the WETDZ for the first five years following the date of its establishment, and will further receive a financial award equal to 50% of the portion of the enterprise income tax proceeds contributed by PFL that is reserved by the WETDZ for the following five years. PFL will receive a science and technology financial award from the WETDZ for up to approximately $325,000 (RMB 2 million) to be paid pro rata according to the actually contributed registered capital. In the event that the central government promulgates laws or regulations that expressly prohibit local governments from providing financial subsidies for enterprises’ income tax payment obligation, this agreement with WETDZ may be rendered illegal and/or unenforceable and therefore PFL’s business plan may be negatively affected.

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Our global income may be subject to PRC taxes under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law, or the New EIT Law, and its implementation rules, which became effective in January 2008, an enterprise established outside of the PRC with a “de facto management body” located within the PRC is considered a PRC resident enterprise and will be subject to the enterprise income tax at the rate of 25% on its global income. The implementation rules define the term “de facto management bodies” as “establishments that carry out substantial and overall management and control over the manufacturing and business operations, personnel and human resources, finance and treasury, and acquisition and disposition of properties and other assets of an enterprise.” On April 22, 2009, the State Administration of Taxation (the “SAT”), issued a circular, or SAT Circular 82, which provides certain specific criteria for determining whether the “de facto management body” of a PRC-controlled enterprise that is incorporated offshore is located in China. Although the SAT Circular 82 only applies to offshore enterprises controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups, not those controlled by PRC individuals or foreigners, the determining criteria set forth in the SAT Circular 82 may reflect the SAT’s general position on how the “de facto management body” text should be applied in determining the resident status of all offshore enterprises for the purpose of PRC tax, regardless of whether they are controlled by PRC enterprises or individuals. Although we do not believe that our legal entities organized outside of the PRC constitute PRC resident enterprises, it is possible that the PRC tax authorities could reach a different conclusion. In such case, we may be considered a PRC resident enterprise and may therefore be subject to the 25% enterprise income tax on our global income. If we are considered a resident enterprise and earn income other than dividends from our PRC subsidiary, a 25% enterprise income tax on our global income could significantly increase our tax burden and materially and adversely affect our cash flow and profitability. In addition to the uncertainty regarding how the new PRC resident enterprise classification for tax purposes may apply, it is also possible that the rules may change in the future, possibly with retroactive effect.

Fluctuations in the foreign currency exchange rate between U.S. Dollars and Renminbi could adversely affect our financial condition.

The value of the RMB against the U.S. dollar and other currencies may fluctuate. Exchange rates are affected by, among other things, changes in political and economic conditions and the foreign exchange policy adopted by the PRC government. On July 21, 2005, the PRC government changed its policy of pegging the value of the RMB to the U.S. dollar. Under the new policy, the RMB is permitted to fluctuate within a narrow and managed band against a basket of foreign currencies. Following the removal of the U.S. dollar peg, the RMB appreciated more than 20% against the U.S. dollar over three years. From July 2008 until June 2010, however, the RMB traded stably within a narrow range against the U.S. dollar. There remains significant international pressure on the PRC government to adopt a more flexible currency policy, which could result in a further and more significant appreciation of the RMB against foreign currencies. On June 20, 2010, the PBOC announced that the PRC government would reform the RMB exchange rate regime and increase the flexibility of the exchange rate. We cannot predict how this new policy will impact the RMB exchange rate.

Our revenues and costs are mostly denominated in the RMB, and a significant portion of our financial assets are also denominated in the RMB. Any significant fluctuations in the exchange rate between the RMB and the U.S. dollar may materially adversely affect our cash flows, revenues, earnings and financial position, and the amount of and any dividends we may pay on our Common Stock in U.S. dollars. In addition, fluctuations in the exchange rate between the RMB and the U.S. dollar could also result in foreign currency translation losses for financial reporting purposes.

Future inflation in China may inhibit economic activity and adversely affect our operations.

The Chinese economy has experienced periods of rapid expansion in recent years which can lead to high rates of inflation or deflation. This has caused the PRC government to, from time to time, enact various corrective measures designed to restrict the availability of credit or regulate growth and contain inflation. High inflation may in the future cause the PRC government to once again impose controls on credit and/or prices, or to take other action, which could inhibit economic activity in China. Any action on the part of the PRC government that seeks to control credit and/or prices may adversely affect our business operations.

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PRC laws and regulations have established more complex procedures for certain acquisitions of Chinese companies by foreign investors, which could make it more difficult for us to pursue growth through acquisitions in China.

Further to the Regulations on Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors, or the New M&A Rules, the Anti-monopoly Law of the PRC, the Rules of Ministry of Commerce on Implementation of Security Review System of Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors promulgated by MOFCOM or the MOFCOM Security Review Rules, was issued in August 2011, which established additional procedures and requirements that are expected to make merger and acquisition activities in China by foreign investors more time-consuming and complex, including requirements in some instances that MOFCOM be notified in advance of any change of control transaction in which a foreign investor takes control of a PRC enterprise, or that the approval from MOFCOM be obtained in circumstances where overseas companies established or controlled by PRC enterprises or residents acquire affiliated domestic companies. PRC laws and regulations also require certain merger and acquisition transactions to be subject to merger control review and or security review.

The MOFCOM Security Review Rules, effective from September 1, 2011, which implement the Notice of the General Office of the State Council on Establishing the Security Review System for Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors promulgated on February 3, 2011, further provide that, when deciding whether a specific merger or acquisition of a domestic enterprise by foreign investors is subject to the security review by MOFCOM, the principle of substance over form should be applied and foreign investors are prohibited from bypassing the security review requirement by structuring transactions through proxies, trusts, indirect investments, leases, loans, control through contractual arrangements or offshore transactions.

Further, if the business of any target company that we seek to acquire falls into the scope of security review, we may not be able to successfully acquire such company either by equity or asset acquisition, capital contribution or through any contractual arrangement. We may grow our business in part by acquiring other companies operating in our industry. Complying with the requirements of the relevant regulations to complete such transactions could be time consuming, and any required approval processes, including approval from MOFCOM, may delay or inhibit our ability to complete such transactions, which could affect our ability to maintain or expand our market share.

In addition, SAFE promulgated the Circular on the Relevant Operating Issues concerning Administration Improvement of Payment and Settlement of Foreign Currency Capital of Foreign-invested Enterprises, or Circular 142, on August 29, 2008. Its subsequent Supplementary Notice on Issues Relating to the Improvement of Business Operations over Payment and Settlement of Foreign Exchange Capital of Foreign-Invested Enterprises was promulgated by SAFE on July 18, 2011. Under Circular 142, registered capital of a foreign-invested company settled in RMB converted from foreign currencies may only be used within the business scope approved by the applicable governmental authority and may not be used for equity investments in the PRC. In addition, foreign-invested companies may not change how they use such capital without SAFE’s approval, and may not in any case use such capital to repay RMB loans if they have not used the proceeds of such loans according to the loan agreement. Furthermore, SAFE promulgated a circular on November 19, 2012, or Circular 59, which requires the authenticity of settlement of net proceeds from offshore offerings to be closely examined and the net proceeds to be settled in the manner described in the offering documents. Circular 142 and Circular 59 may significantly limit our ability to effectively use the proceeds from future financing activities as the WFOE may not convert the funds received from us in foreign currencies into RMB, which may adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business in the PRC.

Failure to comply with the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act could subject us to penalties and other adverse consequences.

As our ultimate holding Company is a Delaware corporation, we are subject to the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which generally prohibits United States companies from engaging in bribery or other prohibited payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Foreign companies, including some that may compete with us, are not subject to these prohibitions. Corruption, extortion, bribery, pay-offs, theft and other fraudulent practices may occur from time-to-time in the PRC. Our employees or other agents may engage in such conduct for which we might be held responsible. If our employees or other agents are found to have engaged in such practices, we could suffer severe penalties and other consequences that may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Recent SEC’s administrative proceedings against the China affiliates of the five multi-national accounting firms may lead to the deregistering of Chinese accounting firms by the PCAOB, which may affect our ability to engage qualified independent auditors.

The SEC recently commenced administrative proceedings against BDO China Dahua Co. Ltd., Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Certified Public Accountants Ltd., Ernst & Young Hua Ming LLP, KPMG Huazhen (Special General Fund) and PricewaterhouseCoopers Zhong Tian CPAs Limited for refusing to produce audit work papers and other documents related to PRC-based companies under investigation by the SEC for potential accounting fraud against U.S. investors. The SEC has launched an initiative to address concerns arising from reverse mergers and foreign issuers. The SEC charged these accounting firms with violations of the Securities Exchange Act and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which requires foreign public accounting firms to provide, upon the request of the SEC, audit work papers involving any company trading on U.S. markets. Under PRC law, auditors are not permitted to hand over audit work papers as books and records of Chinese companies are afforded protection of secrecy laws. We are not in a position to assess the outcome or ramifications of these ongoing proceedings and investigations. Unless the PRC government changes its secrecy laws, there are risks that the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”) may deregister Chinese accounting firms whose audit work papers the PCAOB cannot inspect and such deregistering of Chinese accounting firms by the PCAOB would, in turn, make it difficult for us to engage qualified independent auditors.

If we become directly subject to the recent scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity involving U.S.-listed Chinese companies, we may have to expend significant resources to investigate and resolve the matter which could harm our business operations, and our reputation and could result in a loss to our stockholders, especially if such matter cannot be addressed and resolved favorably.

Recently, U.S. public companies that have substantially all of their operations in China, have been the subject of intense scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity by investors, financial commentators and regulatory agencies, such as the SEC. Much of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity has centered around financial and accounting irregularities, a lack of effective internal controls over financial accounting, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity, the publicly traded stock of many U.S. listed Chinese companies has sharply decreased in value and, in some cases, has become virtually worthless. Many of these companies are now subject to shareholder lawsuits and SEC enforcement actions and are conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations. It is not clear what effect this sector-wide scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity will have on our company and our business. If we become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we will have to expend significant resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend the Company. This situation may be a major distraction to our management. If such allegations are not proven to be groundless, our company and business operations will be severely hampered and your investment in our stock could be rendered worthless.

The disclosures in our reports and other filings with the SEC and our other public pronouncements are not subject to the scrutiny of any regulatory bodies in the PRC.

Our reports and other filings with the SEC are subject to SEC review in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Act and the Exchange Act. Our SEC filings and other disclosure and public pronouncements are not subject to the review or scrutiny of any PRC regulatory authority. For example, the disclosure in our SEC reports and other filings are not subject to the review by CSRC, a PRC regulator that is tasked with oversight of the capital markets in China. Accordingly, you should review our SEC reports, filings and our other public pronouncements with the understanding that no local regulator has done any review of our company, our SEC reports, other filings or any of our other public pronouncements.

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Risks Relating to Our Corporate Structure

We conduct our lending and guarantee business through Wujiang Luxiang by means of contractual arrangements. If the PRC courts or administrative authorities determines that these contractual arrangements do not comply with applicable regulations, we could be subject to severe penalties and our business could be adversely affected. In addition, changes in such Chinese laws and regulations may materially and adversely affect our business.

There are uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws, rules and regulations, including but not limited to the laws, rules and regulations governing the validity and enforcement of the contractual arrangements between WFOE and each of Wujiang Luxiang. Although we were advised by our PRC counsel, Dacheng Law Offices, that based on their understanding of the current PRC laws, rules and regulations, the structure for operating our business in China (including our corporate structure and contractual arrangements with Wujiang Luxiang and its shareholders) comply with all applicable PRC laws, rules and regulations, and do not violate, breach, contravene or otherwise conflict with any applicable PRC laws, rules or regulations, the PRC courts or regulatory authorities may determine that our corporate structure and contractual arrangements violate PRC laws, rules or regulations. We are aware of a recent case involving Chinachem Financial Services where certain contractual arrangements for a Hong Kong Company to gain economic control over a PRC Company were declared to be void by the PRC Supreme People’s Court. If the PRC courts or regulatory authorities determine that our contractual arrangements are in violation of applicable PRC laws, rules or regulations, our contractual arrangements will become invalid or unenforceable.

If WFOE, Wujiang Luxiang or their ownership structure or the contractual arrangements, are determined to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws, rules or regulations, or WFOE, or Wujiang Luxiang fails to obtain or maintain any of the required governmental permits or approvals, the relevant PRC regulatory authorities would have broad discretion in dealing with such violations, including:

revoking the business and operating licenses of WFOE, or Wujiang Luxiang;
discontinuing or restricting the operations of WFOE or Wujiang Luxiang;
imposing conditions or requirements with which we, WFOE or Wujiang Luxiang may not be able to comply;
requiring us, WFOE or Wujiang Luxiang to restructure the relevant ownership structure or operations;
restricting or prohibiting our use of the proceeds from our initial public offering to finance our business and operations in China; or
imposing fines.

The imposition of any of these penalties would severely disrupt our ability to conduct business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

On or around September 2011, various media sources reported that the China Securities Regulatory Commission (the “CSRC”) had prepared a report proposing pre-approval by a competent central government authority of offshore listings by China-based companies with variable interest entity structures, such as ours, that operate in industry sectors subject to foreign investment restrictions. However, it is unclear whether the CSRC officially issued or submitted such a report to a higher level government authority or what any such report provides, or whether any new PRC laws or regulations relating to variable interest entity structures will be adopted or what they would provide. If our ownership structure, contractual arrangements or businesses of Wujiang Luxiang are found to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws or regulations, the relevant governmental authorities, including the CSRC, would have broad discretion in dealing with such violation, including levying fines, confiscating our income or the income of Wujiang Luxiang, revoking the business licenses or operating licenses of Wujiang Luxiang, discontinuing or placing restrictions or onerous conditions on our operations, requiring us to undergo a costly and disruptive restructuring, restricting or prohibiting our use of proceeds from overseas financings to finance our business and operations in China, and taking other regulatory or enforcement actions that could be harmful to our business. Any of these actions could cause significant disruption to our business operations and severely damage our reputation, which would in turn materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Our contractual arrangements with Wujiang Luxiang may not be effective in providing control over Wujiang Luxiang.

All of our current revenue and net income is derived from Wujiang Luxiang. According to our inquiries with Jiangsu provincial authorities, provincial direct foreign controlling equity ownership in for-profit companies engaged in rural microcredit services in Jiangsu Province has never been approved and such position will not change in the foreseeable future. Therefore, we do not intend to have an equity ownership interest in Wujiang Luxiang but rely on contractual arrangements with Wujiang Luxiang to control and operate its business. However, these contractual arrangements may not be effective in providing us with the necessary control over Wujiang Luxiang and its operations. Any deficiency in these contractual arrangements may result in our loss of control over the management and operations of Wujiang Luxiang, which will result in a significant loss in the value of an investment in our company. Because of the practical restrictions on direct foreign equity ownership imposed by the Jiangsu provincial government authorities, we must rely on contractual rights through our VIE structure to effect control over and management of Wujiang Luxiang, which exposes us to the risk of potential breach of contract by the shareholders of Wujiang Luxiang. In addition, as Wujiang Luxiang is jointly owned by its shareholders, it may be difficult for us to change our corporate structure if such shareholders refuse to cooperate with us.

The failure to comply with PRC regulations relating to mergers and acquisitions of domestic enterprises by offshore special purpose vehicles may subject us to severe fines or penalties and create other regulatory uncertainties regarding our corporate structure.

On August 8, 2006, MOFCOM, joined by the CSRC, the State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission of the State Council, the SAT, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce (the “SAIC”), and SAFE, jointly promulgated regulations entitled the Provisions Regarding Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors (the “M&A Rules”), which took effect as of September 8, 2006, and as amended on June 22, 2009. This regulation, among other things, has certain provisions that require offshore special purpose vehicles formed for the purpose of acquiring PRC domestic companies and controlled directly or indirectly by PRC individuals and companies, to obtain the approval of MOFCOM prior to engaging in such acquisitions and to obtain the approval of the CSRC prior to publicly listing their securities on an overseas stock market. On September 21, 2006, the CSRC published on its official website a notice specifying the documents and materials that are required to be submitted for obtaining CSRC approval.

The application of the M&A Rules with respect to our corporate structure remains unclear, with no current consensus existing among leading PRC law firms regarding the scope and applicability of the M&A Rules. We believe that the MOFCOM and CSRC approvals under the M&A Rules were not required in the context of our share exchange transaction because at such time the share exchange was a foreign related transaction governed by foreign laws, not subject to the jurisdiction of PRC laws and regulations. However, we cannot be certain that the relevant PRC government agencies, including the CSRC and MOFCOM, would reach the same conclusion, and we cannot be certain that MOFCOM or the CSRC will not deem that the transactions effected by the share exchange circumvented the M&A Rules, and other rules and notices, or that prior MOFCOM or CSRC approval is required for overseas financing. Further, we cannot rule out the possibility that the relevant PRC government agencies, including MOFCOM, would deem that the M&A Rules required us or our entities in China to obtain approval from MOFCOM or other PRC regulatory agencies in connection with WFOE’s control of Wujiang Luxiang through contractual arrangements.

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If the CSRC, MOFCOM, or another PRC regulatory agency subsequently determines that CSRC, MOFCOM or other approval was required for the share exchange transaction and/or the VIE arrangements between WFOE and Wujiang Luxiang, or if prior CSRC approval for overseas financings is required and not obtained, we may face severe regulatory actions or other sanctions from MOFCOM, the CSRC or other PRC regulatory agencies. In such event, these regulatory agencies may impose fines or other penalties on our operations in the PRC, limit our operating privileges in the PRC, delay or restrict the repatriation of the proceeds from overseas financings into the PRC, restrict or prohibit payment or remittance of dividends to us or take other actions that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, reputation and prospects, as well as the trading price of our Common Stock. The CSRC or other PRC regulatory agencies may also take actions requiring us, or making it advisable for us, to delay or cancel overseas financings, to restructure our current corporate structure, or to seek regulatory approvals that may be difficult or costly to obtain.

The M&A Rules, along with certain foreign exchange regulations discussed below, will be interpreted or implemented by the relevant government authorities in connection with our future offshore financings or acquisitions, and we cannot predict how they will affect our acquisition strategy. For example, Wujiang Luxiang’s ability to remit its profits to us, or to engage in foreign-currency-denominated borrowings, may be conditioned upon compliance with the SAFE registration requirements by such Chinese domestic residents, over whom we may have no control.

Regulations relating to offshore investment activities by PRC residents may limit our ability to acquire PRC companies and could adversely affect our business.

In July 2014, SAFE promulgated theCircular on Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Administration Over the Overseas Investment and Financing and Roundtrip Investment by Domestic Residents Via Special Purpose Vehicles, or Circular 37, which replaced RelevantIssues Concerning Foreign Exchange Control on Domestic Residents’ Corporate Financing and Roundtrip Investment through Offshore Special Purpose Vehicles, or Circular 75. Circular 37 requires PRC residents to register with local branches of SAFE in connection with their direct establishment or indirect control of an offshore entity, referred to in Circular 37 as a “special purpose vehicle” for the purpose of holding domestic or offshore assets or interests. Circular 37 further requires amendment to a PRC resident’s registration in the event of any significant changes with respect to the special purpose vehicle, such as an increase or decrease in the capital contributed by PRC individuals, share transfer or exchange, merger, division or other material event. Under these regulations, PRC residents’ failure to comply with specified registration procedures may result in restrictions being imposed on the foreign exchange activities of the relevant PRC entity, including the payment of dividends and other distributions to its offshore parent, as well as restrictions on capital inflows from the offshore entity to the PRC entity, including restrictions on its ability to contribute additional capital to its PRC subsidiaries. Further, failure to comply with the SAFE registration requirements could result in penalties under PRC law for evasion of foreign exchange regulations.

As Circular 37 is newly-issued, it is unclear how these regulations will be interpreted and implemented. In addition, different local SAFE branches may have different views and procedures as to the interpretation and implementation of the SAFE regulations, and it may be difficult for our ultimate shareholders or beneficial owners who are PRC residents to provide sufficient supporting documents required by the SAFE or to complete the required registration with the SAFE in a timely manner, or at all. Any failure by any of our shareholders who is a PRC resident, or is controlled by a PRC resident, to comply with relevant requirements under these regulations could subject us to fines or sanctions imposed by the PRC government, including restrictions on WFOE’s ability to pay dividends or make distributions to us and on our ability to increase our investment in the WFOE.

Our agreements with Wujiang Luxiang are governed by the laws of the PRC and we may have difficulty in enforcing any rights we may have under these contractual arrangements.

As all of our contractual arrangements with Wujiang Luxiang are governed by the PRC laws and provide for the resolution of disputes through arbitration in the PRC, they would be interpreted in accordance with PRC law and any disputes would be resolved in accordance with PRC legal procedures. The legal environment in the PRC is not as developed as in the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could further limit our ability to enforce these contractual arrangements. Furthermore, these contracts may not be enforceable in China if PRC government authorities or courts take a view that such contracts contravene PRC laws and regulations or are otherwise not enforceable for public policy reasons. In the event we are unable to enforce these contractual arrangements, we may not be able to exert effective control over Wujiang Luxiang, and our ability to conduct our business may be materially and adversely affected.

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The Wujiang Luxiang Shareholders have potential conflicts of interest with us, which may adversely affect our business.

All ultimate individual shareholders of the 11 Chinese entities and Mr. Huichun Qin, which collectively own 100% of Wujiang Luxiang’s outstanding equity interests, or their representatives, are beneficial owners of shares of Common Stock of CCC through their BVI entities. Equity interests held by each of these shareholders in CCC is less than its interest in Wujiang Luxiang as a result of our introduction of outside investors as shareholders of CCC. In addition, such shareholders’ equity interest in our company will be further diluted as a result of any future offering of equity securities. As a result, conflicts of interest may arise as a result of such dual shareholding and governance structure.

If such conflicts arise, these shareholders may not act in our best interests and such conflicts of interest may not be resolved in our favor. In addition, these shareholders may breach or cause Wujiang Luxiang to breach or refuse to renew the VIE Agreements that allow us to exercise effective control over Wujiang Luxiang and to receive economic benefits from Wujiang Luxiang. Delaware law provides that directors owe a fiduciary duty to a company, which requires them to act in good faith and in the best interests of the company and not to use their positions for personal gain. If we cannot resolve any conflicts of interest or disputes between us and such shareholders or any future beneficial owners of Wujiang Luxiang, we would have to rely on arbitral or legal proceedings to remedy the situation. Such arbitral and legal proceedings may cost us substantial financial and other resources and result in disruption of our business, the outcome of which may adversely affect the Company.

If Wujiang Luxiang, or PFL fail to maintain the requisite registered capital, licenses and approvals required under PRC law, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

Foreign investment is highly regulated by the PRC government and the foreign investment in the lending industry is restricted by local authorities. Numerous regulatory authorities of the central PRC government, provincial and local authorities are empowered to issue and implement regulations governing various aspects of the lending industry. Foreign investment in the financial leasing industry is also subject to foreign investment regulations. Each of Wujiang Luxiang and PFL are required to obtain and maintain certain assets relevant to its business as well as applicable licenses or approvals from different regulatory authorities in order to provide their current services. These registered capital and licenses are essential to the operation of our business and are generally subject to annual review by the relevant governmental authorities. Furthermore, Wujiang Luxiang and PFL may be required to obtain additional licenses. If we fail to obtain or maintain any of the required registered capital, licenses or approvals, our continued business operations in the lending, and leasing industries may subject us to various penalties, such as confiscation of illegal net revenue, fines and the discontinuation or restriction of our operations. Any such disruption in the business operations of Wujiang Luxiang or PFL will materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Relating to Our Securities

Our Common Stock may be thinly traded and our stockholders may be unable to sell at or near ask prices or at all if they need to sell their shares to raise money or otherwise desire to liquidate their shares.

Our Common Stock may be “thinly-traded”, meaning that the number of persons interested in purchasing our Common Stock at or near bid prices at any given time may be relatively small or non-existent. This situation may be attributable to a number of factors, including the fact that we are a small company which is relatively unknown to stock analysts, stock brokers, institutional investors and others in the investment community that generate or influence sales volume, and that even if we came to the attention of such persons, they tend to be risk-averse and might be reluctant to follow an unproven company such as ours or purchase or recommend the purchase of our shares until such time as we became more seasoned. As a consequence, there may be periods of several days or more when trading activity in our shares is minimal or non-existent, as compared to a seasoned issuer which has a large and steady volume of trading activity that will generally support continuous sales without an adverse effect on share price. Broad or active public trading market for our Common Stock may not develop or be sustained.

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The market price for our Common Stock may be volatile.

The market price for our Common Stock may be volatile and subject to wide fluctuations due to factors such as:

the perception of U.S. investors and regulators of U.S. listed Chinese companies;
actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly operating results;
changes in financial estimates by securities research analysts;
negative publicity, studies or reports;
conditions in Chinese credit markets;
changes in the economic performance or market valuations of other microcredit companies;
announcements by us or our competitors of acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments;
addition or departure of key personnel;
fluctuations of exchange rates between RMB and the U.S. dollar; and
general economic or political conditions in China.

In addition, the securities market has from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are not related to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also materially and adversely affect the market price of our Common Stock.

Volatility in our Common Stock price may subject us to securities litigation.

The market for our Common Stock may have, when compared to seasoned issuers, significant price volatility and we expect that our share price may continue to be more volatile than that of a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. In the past, plaintiffs have often initiated securities class action litigation against a company following periods of volatility in the market price of its securities. We may, in the future, be the target of similar litigation. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and liabilities and could divert management’s attention and resources.

As an “emerging growth company” under applicable law, we will be subject to lessened disclosure requirements. Such reduced disclosure may make our Common Stock less attractive to investors.

For as long as we remain an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, we will elect to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies”, including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. Because of these lessened regulatory requirements, our stockholders would be left without information or rights available to stockholders of more mature companies. If some investors find our Common Stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our Common Stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

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Our status as an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act may make it more difficult to raise capital when we need to do it.

Because of the exemptions from various reporting requirements provided to us as an “emerging growth company”, we may be less attractive to investors and it may be difficult for us to raise additional capital as and when we need it. If we are unable to raise additional capital as and when we need it, our financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

We will incur increased costs and demands upon management as a result of complying with the laws and regulations that affect public companies, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition, business and prospects.

As a public company and particularly after we cease to be an “emerging growth company,” we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company, including costs associated with public company reporting and corporate governance requirements. These requirements include compliance with Section 404(b) and other provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as Section 14 rules implemented by the SEC and NASDAQ. In addition, our management team will also have to adapt to the requirements of being a public company. We expect that compliance with these rules and regulations will substantially increase our legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly.

The increased costs associated with operating as a public company will decrease our net income or increase our net loss, and may require us to reduce costs in other areas of our business or increase the prices of our products or services. Additionally, if these requirements divert our management’s attention from other business concerns, they could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition, business and prospects.

We are obligated to develop and maintain proper and effective internal control over financial reporting. We may not complete our analysis of our internal control over financial reporting in a timely manner, or these internal controls may not be determined to be effective, which may adversely affect investor confidence in our company and, as a result, the value of our Common Stock.

We will be required, pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, to furnish a report by management on, among other things, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting for fiscal 2014, the first fiscal year beginning after our initial public offering. This assessment will need to include disclosure of any material weaknesses identified by our management in our internal control over financial reporting and, after we cease to be an “emerging growth company,” a statement that our independent registered public accounting firm has issued an opinion on our internal control over financial reporting.

We are in the early stages of the costly and challenging process of compiling the system and processing documentation necessary to perform the evaluation needed to comply with Section 404. We may not be able to complete our evaluation, testing and any required remediation in a timely fashion. During the evaluation and testing process, if we identify one or more material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, we will be unable to assert that our internal controls are effective.

If we are unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, or if, when required, our independent registered public accounting firm is unable to express an opinion on the effectiveness of our internal controls, we could lose investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which would cause the price of our Common Stock to decline, and we may be subject to investigation or sanctions by the SEC.

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We will be required to disclose changes made in our internal controls and procedures on a quarterly basis. However, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 until the later of the year following our first annual report required to be filed with the SEC, or the date we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, if we take advantage of the exemptions contained in the JOBS Act. We will remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years. However, if the market value of our Common Stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of any July 31 before that time, our revenues exceed $1 billion, or we issue more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt in a three-year period, we would cease to be an “emerging growth company” as of the following January 31. To comply with the requirements of being a public company, we may need to undertake various actions, such as implementing new internal controls and procedures and hiring accounting or internal audit staff.

Our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting until the later of the year following our first annual report required to be filed with the SEC, or the date we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” At such time, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is adverse in the event it is not satisfied with the level at which our controls are documented, designed or operating. Our remediation efforts may not enable us to avoid a material weakness in the future.

Provisions in our By-laws and Delaware laws might discourage, delay or prevent a change of control of our company or changes in our management and, therefore, depress the trading price of our Common Stock.

Provisions of our by-laws and Delaware laws may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which you might otherwise receive a premium for your shares of our Common Stock. These provisions may also prevent or frustrate attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our management. These provisions include:

the inability of stockholders to act by written consent or to call special meetings;
the ability of our board of directors to make, alter or repeal our by-laws; and
the ability of our board of directors to designate the terms of and issue new series of preferred stock without stockholder approval.

In addition, we are subject to Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which generally prohibits a Delaware corporation from engaging in any of a broad range of business combinations with an interested stockholder for a period of three years following the date on which the stockholder became an interested stockholder, unless such transactions are approved by our board of directors. The existence of the foregoing provisions and anti-takeover measures could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our Common Stock. They could also deter potential acquirers of our company, thereby reducing the likelihood that you could receive a premium for your Common Stock in an acquisition.

The elimination of monetary liability against our directors, officers and employees under our certificate of incorporation and the existence of indemnification of our directors, officers and employees under Delaware law may result in substantial expenditures by us and may discourage lawsuits against our directors, officers and employees.

Our certificate of incorporation contains provisions which eliminate the liability of our directors for monetary damages to us and our stockholders to the maximum extent permitted under the corporate laws of Delaware. We may also provide contractual indemnification obligations under agreements with our directors, officers and employees. These indemnification obligations could result in our incurring substantial expenditures to cover the cost of settlement or damage awards against directors, officers and employees, which we may be unable to recoup. These provisions and resultant costs may also discourage us from bringing a lawsuit against directors, officers and employees for breach of their fiduciary duties, and may similarly discourage the filing of derivative litigation by our shareholders against our directors, officers and employees even though such actions, if successful, might otherwise benefit the Company and our shareholders.

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DISCLOSURE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

This prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference herein contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.  These forward-looking statements are based on our current expectations and beliefs, including estimates and projections about our industry.  Forward-looking statements may be identified by use of terms such as “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “believes” and similar expressions, although some forward-looking statements are expressed differently.  Statements concerning our financial position, business strategy and plans or objectives for future operations are forward-looking statements.  These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict and may cause actual results to differ materially from management’s current expectations.  Such risks and uncertainties include those set forth herein under “Risk Factors.”  The forward-looking statements in this prospectus speak only as of the time they are made and do not necessarily reflect our outlook at any other point in time.

Except as may be required under the federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.  You are advised, however, to read any further disclosures we make on related subjects in our filings with the SEC, including Form 10-K, Form 10-Q and Form 8-K reports.  Also note that under the caption “Risk Factors,” we provide a cautionary discussion of risks, uncertainties and possibly inaccurate assumptions relevant to our business.  These are factors that we think could cause our actual results to differ materially from expected and historical results.  Other factors besides those listed in “Risk Factors,” including factors described as risks in our filings with the SEC, could also adversely affect us.  For any forward-looking statements contained in any document, we claim the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.

USE OF PROCEEDS

Unless otherwise indicated in a prospectus supplement, we intend to use the net proceeds from the sale of the securities under this prospectus for general corporate purposes. We may also use a portion of the net proceeds to acquire or invest in businesses and products that are complementary to our own, although we have no current plans, commitments or agreements with respect to any acquisitions as of the date of this prospectus. Pending the uses described above, we intend to invest the net proceeds in short-term, interest bearing, investment-grade securities.

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DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STOCK

General

The following description of our capital stock (which includes a description of securities we may offer pursuant to the registration statement of which this prospectus, as the same may be supplemented, forms a part) does not purport to be complete and is subject to and qualified in its entirety by our certificate of incorporation, our bylaws and by the applicable provisions of Delaware law.

Our authorized capital stock consists of 110,000,000 shares, par value $0.001 per share, consisting of 100,000,000 shares of common stock and 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock. The following description of our capital stock is intended as a summary only and is qualified in its entirety by reference to our amended certificate of incorporation and bylaws, which have been filed previously with the SEC, and applicable provisions of Delaware law.

We, directly or through agents, dealers or underwriters designated from time to time, may offer, issue and sell, together or separately, up to $30,000,000 in the aggregate of:

common stock;
preferred stock;
secured or unsecured debt securities consisting of notes, debentures or other evidences of indebtedness which may be senior debt securities, senior subordinated debt securities or subordinated debt securities, each of which may be convertible into equity securities;
warrants to purchase our securities;
rights to purchase our securities; or
units comprised of, or other combinations of, the foregoing securities.

We may issue the debt securities as exchangeable for or convertible into shares of common stock, preferred stock or other securities. The preferred stock may also be exchangeable for and/or convertible into shares of common stock, another series of preferred stock or other securities. The debt securities, the preferred stock, the common stock and the warrants are collectively referred to in this prospectus as the “securities.” When a particular series of securities is offered, a supplement to this prospectus will be delivered with this prospectus, which will set forth the terms of the offering and sale of the offered securities.

Common Stock

As of July 11, 2017, there were 17,323,429 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding, held of record by approximately 162 stockholders. The outstanding shares of common stock are fully paid and non-assessable. The holders of common stock are entitled to one vote for each share held of record on all matters submitted to a vote of the stockholders.

Our board is divided into three classes, each of which will generally serve for a term of three years with only one class of directors being elected in each year. The common stock has no cumulative voting rights, including with respect to the election of directors.

Subject to preferential rights with respect to any outstanding preferred stock, holders of common stock are entitled to receive ratably such dividends as may be declared by our board of directors out of funds legally available therefore. Pursuant to Section 281 of Delaware General Corporation Law, in the event of our dissolution, the holders of common stock are entitled to the remaining assets after payment of all liabilities of the company.

Our common stock has no preemptive or conversion rights or other subscription rights.

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Preferred Stock

Our certificate of incorporation, as amended, empowers our board of directors, without action by our shareholders, to issue up to 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock from time to time in one or more series, which preferred stock may be offered by this prospectus and supplements thereto. As of the date of this prospectus, no shares of preferred stock were designated or issued and outstanding. Our board may fix the rights, preferences, privileges and restrictions of our authorized but undesignated preferred shares, including:

dividend rights and preferences over dividends on our common stock or any series of preferred stock;
the dividend rate (and whether dividends are cumulative);
conversion rights, if any;
voting rights;
rights and terms of redemption (including sinking fund provisions, if any);
redemption price and liquidation preferences of any wholly unissued series of any preferred stock and the designation thereof of any of them; and
to increase or decrease the number of shares of any series subsequent to the issue of shares of that series but not below the number of shares then outstanding.

You should refer to the prospectus supplement relating to the series of preferred stock being offered for the specific terms of that series, including:

title of the series and the number of shares in the series;
the price at which the preferred stock will be offered;
the dividend rate or rates or method of calculating the rates, the dates on which the dividends will be payable, whether or not dividends will be cumulative or noncumulative and, if cumulative, the dates from which dividends on the preferred stock being offered will cumulate;
the voting rights, if any, of the holders of shares of the preferred stock being offered;
the provisions for a sinking fund, if any, and the provisions for redemption, if applicable, of the preferred stock being offered, including any restrictions on the foregoing as a result of arrearage in the payment of dividends or sinking fund installments;
the liquidation preference per share;
the terms and conditions, if applicable, upon which the preferred stock being offered will be convertible into our common stock, including the conversion price, or the manner of calculating the conversion price, and the conversion period;
the terms and conditions, if applicable, upon which the preferred stock being offered will be exchangeable for debt securities, including the exchange price, or the manner of calculating the exchange price, and the exchange period;
any listing of the preferred stock being offered on any securities exchange;
a discussion of any material federal income tax considerations applicable to the preferred stock being offered;
any preemptive rights;
the relative ranking and preferences of the preferred stock being offered as to dividend rights and rights upon liquidation, dissolution or the winding up of our affairs;
any limitations on the issuance of any class or series of preferred stock ranking senior or equal to the series of preferred stock being offered as to dividend rights and rights upon liquidation, dissolution or the winding up of our affairs; and
any additional rights, preferences, qualifications, limitations and restrictions of the series.

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Upon issuance, the shares of preferred stock will be fully paid and nonassessable, which means that its holders will have paid their purchase price in full and we may not require them to pay additional funds.

Any preferred stock terms selected by our board of directors could decrease the amount of earnings and assets available for distribution to holders of our common stock or adversely affect the rights and power, including voting rights, of the holders of our common stock without any further vote or action by the stockholders. The rights of holders of our common stock will be subject to, and may be adversely affected by, the rights of the holders of any preferred stock that may be issued by us in the future. The issuance of preferred stock could also have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control of our company or make removal of management more difficult.

Debt Securities

As used in this prospectus, the term “debt securities” means the debentures, notes, bonds and other evidences of indebtedness that we may issue from time to time. The debt securities will either be senior debt securities, senior subordinated debt or subordinated debt securities. We may also issue convertible debt securities. Debt securities issued under an indenture (which we refer to herein as an Indenture) will be entered into between us and a trustee to be named therein. It is likely that convertible debt securities will not be issued under an Indenture.

The Indenture or forms of Indentures, if any, will be filed as exhibits to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part.

Events of Default Under the Indenture

Unless we provide otherwise in the prospectus supplement or free writing prospectus applicable to a particular series of debt securities, the following are events of default under the indentures with respect to any series of debt securities that we may issue:

● if we fail to pay the principal or premium, if any, when due and payable at maturity, upon redemption or repurchase or otherwise;

● if we fail to pay interest when due and payable and our failure continues for certain days;

● if we fail to observe or perform any other covenant contained in the Securities of a Series or in this Indenture, and our failure continues for certain days after we receive written notice from the trustee or holders of at least certain percentage in aggregate principal amount of the outstanding debt securities of the applicable series. The written notice must specify the Default, demand that it be remedied and state that the notice is a “Notice of Default”;

● if specified events of bankruptcy, insolvency or reorganization occur; and

● if any other event of default provided with respect to securities of that series, which is specified in a Board Resolution, a supplemental indenture hereto or an Officers’ Certificate as defined in the Form of Indenture.

We covenant in the Form of Indenture to deliver a certificate to the trustee annually, within certain days after the close of the fiscal year, to show that we are in compliance with the terms of the indenture and that we have not defaulted under the indenture. Nonetheless, if we issue debt securities, the terms of the debt securities and the final form of indenture will be provided in a prospectus supplement. Please refer to the prospectus supplement and the form of indenture attached thereto for the terms and conditions of the offered debt securities. The terms and conditions may or may not include whether or not we must furnish periodic evidence showing that an event of default does not exist or that we are in compliance with the terms of the indenture.

The statements and descriptions in this prospectus or in any prospectus supplement regarding provisions of the Indentures and debt securities are summaries thereof, do not purport to be complete and are subject to, and are qualified in their entirety by reference to, all of the provisions of the Indentures (and any amendments or supplements we may enter into from time to time which are permitted under each Indenture) and the debt securities, including the definitions therein of certain terms.

General

Unless otherwise specified in a prospectus supplement, the debt securities will be direct secured or unsecured obligations of our company. The senior debt securities will rank equally with any of our other unsecured senior and unsubordinated debt. The subordinated debt securities will be subordinate and junior in right of payment to any senior indebtedness.

We may issue debt securities from time to time in one or more series, in each case with the same or various maturities, at par or at a discount. Unless indicated in a prospectus supplement, we may issue additional debt securities of a particular series without the consent of the holders of the debt securities of such series outstanding at the time of the issuance. Any such additional debt securities, together with all other outstanding debt securities of that series, will constitute a single series of debt securities under the applicable Indenture and will be equal in ranking.

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Should an indenture relate to unsecured indebtedness, in the event of a bankruptcy or other liquidation event involving a distribution of assets to satisfy our outstanding indebtedness or an event of default under a loan agreement relating to secured indebtedness of our company or its subsidiaries, the holders of such secured indebtedness, if any, would be entitled to receive payment of principal and interest prior to payments on the senior indebtedness issued under an Indenture.

Prospectus Supplement

Each prospectus supplement will describe the terms relating to the specific series of debt securities being offered. These terms will include some or all of the following:

the title of debt securities and whether they are subordinated, senior subordinated or senior debt securities;
any limit on the aggregate principal amount of debt securities of such series;
the percentage of the principal amount at which the debt securities of any series will be issued;
the ability to issue additional debt securities of the same series;
the purchase price for the debt securities and the denominations of the debt securities;
the specific designation of the series of debt securities being offered;
the maturity date or dates of the debt securities and the date or dates upon which the debt securities are payable and the rate or rates at which the debt securities of the series shall bear interest, if any, which may be fixed or variable, or the method by which such rate shall be determined;
the basis for calculating interest if other than 360-day year or twelve 30-day months;
the date or dates from which any interest will accrue or the method by which such date or dates will be determined;
the duration of any deferral period, including the maximum consecutive period during which interest payment periods may be extended;
whether the amount of payments of principal of (and premium, if any) or interest on the debt securities may be determined with reference to any index, formula or other method, such as one or more currencies, commodities, equity indices or other indices, and the manner of determining the amount of such payments;
the dates on which we will pay interest on the debt securities and the regular record date for determining who is entitled to the interest payable on any interest payment date;
the place or places where the principal of (and premium, if any) and interest on the debt securities will be payable, where any securities may be surrendered for registration of transfer, exchange or conversion, as applicable, and notices and demands may be delivered to or upon us pursuant to the applicable Indenture;
the rate or rates of amortization of the debt securities;
if we possess the option to do so, the periods within which and the prices at which we may redeem the debt securities, in whole or in part, pursuant to optional redemption provisions, and the other terms and conditions of any such provisions;
our obligation or discretion, if any, to redeem, repay or purchase debt securities by making periodic payments to a sinking fund or through an analogous provision or at the option of holders of the debt securities, and the period or periods within which and the price or prices at which we will redeem, repay or purchase the debt securities, in whole or in part, pursuant to such obligation, and the other terms and conditions of such obligation;
the terms and conditions, if any, regarding the option or mandatory conversion or exchange of debt securities;
the period or periods within which, the price or prices at which and the terms and conditions upon which any debt securities of the series may be redeemed, in whole or in part at our option and, if other than by a board resolution, the manner in which any election by us to redeem the debt securities shall be evidenced;
any restriction or condition on the transferability of the debt securities of a particular series;
the portion, or methods of determining the portion, of the principal amount of the debt securities which we must pay upon the acceleration of the maturity of the debt securities in connection with any event of default if other than the full principal amount;

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the currency or currencies in which the debt securities will be denominated and in which principal, any premium and any interest will or may be payable or a description of any units based on or relating to a currency or currencies in which the debt securities will be denominated;
provisions, if any, granting special rights to holders of the debt securities upon the occurrence of specified events;
any deletions from, modifications of or additions to the events of default or our covenants with respect to the applicable series of debt securities, and whether or not such events of default or covenants are consistent with those contained in the applicable Indenture;
any limitation on our ability to incur debt, redeem stock, sell our assets or other restrictions;
the application, if any, of the terms of the applicable Indenture relating to defeasance and covenant defeasance (which terms are described below) to the debt securities;
what subordination provisions will apply to the debt securities;
the terms, if any, upon which the holders may convert or exchange the debt securities into or for our common stock, preferred stock or other securities or property;

whether we are issuing the debt securities in whole or in part in global form;
any change in the right of the trustee or the requisite holders of debt securities to declare the principal amount thereof due and payable because of an event of default;
the depositary for global or certificated debt securities, if any;
any material federal income tax consequences applicable to the debt securities, including any debt securities denominated and made payable, as described in the prospectus supplements, in foreign currencies, or units based on or related to foreign currencies;
any right we may have to satisfy, discharge and defease our obligations under the debt securities, or terminate or eliminate restrictive covenants or events of default in the Indentures, by depositing money or U.S. government obligations with the trustee of the Indentures;
the names of any trustees, depositories, authenticating or paying agents, transfer agents or registrars or other agents with respect to the debt securities;
to whom any interest on any debt security shall be payable, if other than the person in whose name the security is registered, on the record date for such interest, the extent to which, or the manner in which, any interest payable on a temporary global debt security will be paid if other than in the manner provided in the applicable Indenture;
if the principal of or any premium or interest on any debt securities is to be payable in one or more currencies or currency units other than as stated, the currency, currencies or currency units in which it shall be paid and the periods within and terms and conditions upon which such election is to be made and the amounts payable (or the manner in which such amount shall be determined);
the portion of the principal amount of any debt securities which shall be payable upon declaration of acceleration of the maturity of the debt securities pursuant to the applicable Indenture if other than the entire principal amount;
if the principal amount payable at the stated maturity of any debt security of the series will not be determinable as of any one or more dates prior to the stated maturity, the amount which shall be deemed to be the principal amount of such debt securities as of any such date for any purpose, including the principal amount thereof which shall be due and payable upon any maturity other than the stated maturity or which shall be deemed to be outstanding as of any date prior to the stated maturity (or, in any such case, the manner in which such amount deemed to be the principal amount shall be determined); and
any other specific terms of the debt securities, including any modifications to the events of default under the debt securities and any other terms which may be required by or advisable under applicable laws or regulations.

Unless otherwise specified in the applicable prospectus supplement, the debt securities will not be listed on any securities exchange. Holders of the debt securities may present registered debt securities for exchange or transfer in the manner described in the applicable prospectus supplement. Except as limited by the applicable Indenture, we will provide these services without charge, other than any tax or other governmental charge payable in connection with the exchange or transfer.

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Debt securities may bear interest at a fixed rate or a variable rate as specified in the prospectus supplement. In addition, if specified in the prospectus supplement, we may sell debt securities bearing no interest or interest at a rate that at the time of issuance is below the prevailing market rate, or at a discount below their stated principal amount. We will describe in the applicable prospectus supplement any special federal income tax considerations applicable to these discounted debt securities.

We may issue debt securities with the principal amount payable on any principal payment date, or the amount of interest payable on any interest payment date, to be determined by referring to one or more currency exchange rates, commodity prices, equity indices or other factors. Holders of such debt securities may receive a principal amount on any principal payment date, or interest payments on any interest payment date, that are greater or less than the amount of principal or interest otherwise payable on such dates, depending upon the value on such dates of applicable currency, commodity, equity index or other factors. The applicable prospectus supplement will contain information as to how we will determine the amount of principal or interest payable on any date, as well as the currencies, commodities, equity indices or other factors to which the amount payable on that date relates and certain additional tax considerations.

Warrants

We may issue warrants for the purchase of our common stock, preferred stock or debt securities or any combination thereof. Warrants may be issued independently or together with our common stock, preferred stock or debt securities and may be attached to or separate from any offered securities. To the extent warrants that we issue are to be publicly-traded, each series of such warrants will be issued under a separate warrant agreement to be entered into between us and a bank or trust company, as warrant agent. The warrant agent will act solely as our agent in connection with such warrants. The warrant agent will not have any obligation or relationship of agency or trust for or with any holders or beneficial owners of warrants.

We will file as exhibits to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part, or will incorporate by reference from a current report on Form 8-K that we file with the SEC, forms of the warrant and warrant agreement, if any. The prospectus supplement relating to any warrants that we may offer will contain the specific terms of the warrants and a description of the material provisions of the applicable warrant agreement, if any. These terms may include the following:

the title of the warrants;
the price or prices at which the warrants will be issued;
the designation, amount and terms of the securities or other rights for which the warrants are exercisable;
the designation and terms of the other securities, if any, with which the warrants are to be issued and the number of warrants issued with each other security;
the aggregate number of warrants;
any provisions for adjustment of the number or amount of securities receivable upon exercise of the warrants or the exercise price of the warrants;
the price or prices at which the securities or other rights purchasable upon exercise of the warrants may be purchased;
if applicable, the date on and after which the warrants and the securities or other rights purchasable upon exercise of the warrants will be separately transferable;
a discussion of any material U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to the exercise of the warrants;
the date on which the right to exercise the warrants will commence, and the date on which the right will expire;
the maximum or minimum number of warrants that may be exercised at any time;
information with respect to book-entry procedures, if any; and
any other terms of the warrants, including terms, procedures and limitations relating to the exchange and exercise of the warrants.

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Exercise of Warrants. Each warrant will entitle the holder of warrants to purchase the amount of securities or other rights, at the exercise price stated or determinable in the prospectus supplement for the warrants. Warrants may be exercised at any time up to the close of business on the expiration date shown in the applicable prospectus supplement, unless otherwise specified in such prospectus supplement. After the close of business on the expiration date, if applicable, unexercised warrants will become void. Warrants may be exercised in the manner described in the applicable prospectus supplement. When the warrant holder makes the payment and properly completes and signs the warrant certificate at the corporate trust office of the warrant agent, if any, or any other office indicated in the prospectus supplement, we will, as soon as possible, forward the securities or other rights that the warrant holder has purchased. If the warrant holder exercises less than all of the warrants represented by the warrant certificate, we will issue a new warrant certificate for the remaining warrants.

Rights

We may issue rights to purchase our securities. The rights may or may not be transferable by the persons purchasing or receiving the rights. In connection with any rights offering, we may enter into a standby underwriting or other arrangement with one or more underwriters or other persons pursuant to which such underwriters or other persons would purchase any offered securities remaining unsubscribed for after such rights offering. Each series of rights will be issued under a separate rights agent agreement to be entered into between us and one or more banks, trust companies or other financial institutions, as rights agent, that we will name in the applicable prospectus supplement. The rights agent will act solely as our agent in connection with the rights and will not assume any obligation or relationship of agency or trust for or with any holders of rights certificates or beneficial owners of rights.

The prospectus supplement relating to any rights that we offer will include specific terms relating to the offering, including, among other matters:

the date of determining the security holders entitled to the rights distribution;
the aggregate number of rights issued and the aggregate amount of securities purchasable upon exercise of the rights;
the exercise price;
the conditions to completion of the rights offering;
the date on which the right to exercise the rights will commence and the date on which the rights will expire; and
any applicable federal income tax considerations.

Each right would entitle the holder of the rights to purchase for cash the principal amount of securities at the exercise price set forth in the applicable prospectus supplement. Rights may be exercised at any time up to the close of business on the expiration date for the rights provided in the applicable prospectus supplement. After the close of business on the expiration date, all unexercised rights will become void.

If less than all of the rights issued in any rights offering are exercised, we may offer any unsubscribed securities directly to persons other than our security holders, to or through agents, underwriters or dealers or through a combination of such methods, including pursuant to standby arrangements, as described in the applicable prospectus supplement.

Units

We may issue units consisting of any combination of the other types of securities offered under this prospectus in one or more series. We may evidence each series of units by unit certificates that we may issue under a separate agreement. We may enter into unit agreements with a unit agent. Each unit agent, if any, may be a bank or trust company that we select. We will indicate the name and address of the unit agent, if any, in the applicable prospectus supplement relating to a particular series of units. Specific unit agreements, if any, will contain additional important terms and provisions. We will file as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part, or will incorporate by reference from a current report that we file with the SEC, the form of unit and the form of each unit agreement, if any, relating to units offered under this prospectus.

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If we offer any units, certain terms of that series of units will be described in the applicable prospectus supplement, including, without limitation, the following, as applicable

the title of the series of units;
identification and description of the separate constituent securities comprising the units;
the price or prices at which the units will be issued;
the date, if any, on and after which the constituent securities comprising the units will be separately transferable;
a discussion of certain United States federal income tax considerations applicable to the units; and
any other material terms of the units and their constituent securities.

Transfer Agent and Registrar

The transfer agent and registrar for our common stock is VStock Transfer, LLC, 18 Lafayette Place, Woodmere, NY 11598, and their telephone number is (212) 828-8436 .

NASDAQ Capital Market Listing

Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “CCCR.”

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

We may sell the securities offered through this prospectus (i) to or through underwriters or dealers, (ii) directly to purchasers, including our affiliates, (iii) through agents, or (iv) through a combination of any these methods. The securities may be distributed at a fixed price or prices, which may be changed, market prices prevailing at the time of sale, prices related to the prevailing market prices, or negotiated prices. The prospectus supplement will include the following information:

the terms of the offering;
the names of any underwriters or agents;
the name or names of any managing underwriter or underwriters;
the purchase price of the securities;
any over-allotment options under which underwriters may purchase additional securities from us;
the net proceeds from the sale of the securities;
any delayed delivery arrangements;
any underwriting discounts, commissions and other items constituting underwriters’ compensation;
any initial public offering price;
any discounts or concessions allowed or reallowed or paid to dealers;
any commissions paid to agents; and
any securities exchange or market on which the securities may be listed.

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Sale Through Underwriters or Dealers

Only underwriters named in the prospectus supplement are underwriters of the securities offered by the prospectus supplement. If underwriters are used in the sale, the underwriters will acquire the securities for their own account, including through underwriting, purchase, security lending or repurchase agreements with us. The underwriters may resell the securities from time to time in one or more transactions, including negotiated transactions. Underwriters may sell the securities in order to facilitate transactions in any of our other securities (described in this prospectus or otherwise), including other public or private transactions and short sales. Underwriters may offer securities to the public either through underwriting syndicates represented by one or more managing underwriters or directly by one or more firms acting as underwriters. Unless otherwise indicated in the prospectus supplement, the obligations of the underwriters to purchase the securities will be subject to certain conditions, and the underwriters will be obligated to purchase all the offered securities if they purchase any of them. The underwriters may change from time to time any public offering price and any discounts or concessions allowed or reallowed or paid to dealers.

If dealers are used in the sale of securities offered through this prospectus, we will sell the securities to them as principals. They may then resell those securities to the public at varying prices determined by the dealers at the time of resale. The prospectus supplement will include the names of the dealers and the terms of the transaction.

We will provide in the applicable prospectus supplement any compensation we will pay to underwriters, dealers or agents in connection with the offering of the securities, and any discounts, concessions or commissions allowed by underwriters to participating dealers.

Direct Sales and Sales Through Agents

We may sell the securities offered through this prospectus directly. In this case, no underwriters or agents would be involved. Such securities may also be sold through agents designated from time to time. The prospectus supplement will name any agent involved in the offer or sale of the offered securities and will describe any commissions payable to the agent. Unless otherwise indicated in the prospectus supplement, any agent will agree to use its reasonable best efforts to solicit purchases for the period of its appointment.

We may sell the securities directly to institutional investors or others who may be deemed to be underwriters within the meaning of the Securities Act with respect to any sale of those securities. The terms of any such sales will be described in the prospectus supplement.

Delayed Delivery Contracts

If the prospectus supplement indicates, we may authorize agents, underwriters or dealers to solicit offers from certain types of institutions to purchase securities at the public offering price under delayed delivery contracts. These contracts would provide for payment and delivery on a specified date in the future. The contracts would be subject only to those conditions described in the prospectus supplement. The applicable prospectus supplement will describe the commission payable for solicitation of those contracts.

Market Making, Stabilization and Other Transactions

Unless the applicable prospectus supplement states otherwise, other than our common stock all securities we offer under this prospectus will be a new issue and will have no established trading market. We may elect to list offered securities on an exchange or in the over-the-counter market. Any underwriters that we use in the sale of offered securities may make a market in such securities, but may discontinue such market making at any time without notice. Therefore, we cannot assure you that the securities will have a liquid trading market.

Any underwriter may also engage in stabilizing transactions, syndicate covering transactions and penalty bids in accordance with Rule 104 under the Securities Exchange Act. Stabilizing transactions involve bids to purchase the underlying security in the open market for the purpose of pegging, fixing or maintaining the price of the securities. Syndicate covering transactions involve purchases of the securities in the open market after the distribution has been completed in order to cover syndicate short positions.

Penalty bids permit the underwriters to reclaim a selling concession from a syndicate member when the securities originally sold by the syndicate member are purchased in a syndicate covering transaction to cover syndicate short positions. Stabilizing transactions, syndicate covering transactions and penalty bids may cause the price of the securities to be higher than it would be in the absence of the transactions. The underwriters may, if they commence these transactions, discontinue them at any time.

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General Information

Agents, underwriters, and dealers may be entitled, under agreements entered into with us, to indemnification by us against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act. Our agents, underwriters, and dealers, or their affiliates, may be customers of, engage in transactions with or perform services for us, in the ordinary course of business.

LEGAL MATTERS

Unless otherwise indicated in the applicable prospectus supplement, the validity of the securities offered by this prospectus, and any supplement thereto, will be passed upon for us by Hunter Taubman Fischer& Li, LLC, New York, NY. The legality of the securities for any underwriters, dealers or agents will be passed upon by counsel as may be specified in the applicable prospectus supplement. will pass on the validity of the common stock being offered in this prospectus.

EXPERTS

Marcum Bernstein & Pinchuk LLP (“Marcum”), independent registered public accounting firm, has audited our financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, as set forth in their reports, which are incorporated by reference in this prospectus and elsewhere in the registration statement. Our financial statements are incorporated by reference in reliance on Marcum’s report, given on their authority as experts in accounting and auditing.

WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

We file annual, quarterly and special reports, along with other information with the SEC. Our SEC filings are available to the public over the Internet at the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. You may also read and copy any document we file at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the Public Reference Room.

This prospectus is part of a registration statement on Form S-3 that we filed with the SEC to register the securities offered hereby under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. This prospectus does not contain all of the information included in the registration statement, including certain exhibits and schedules. You may obtain the registration statement and exhibits to the registration statement from the SEC at the address listed above or from the SEC’s internet site.

INFORMATION INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The Securities and Exchange Commission allows us to incorporate by reference the information we file with them under certain conditions, which means that we can disclose important information to you by referring you to those documents. The information incorporated by reference is considered to be a part of this prospectus and any information that we file subsequent to this prospectus with the Securities and Exchange Commission will automatically update and supersede this information. The documents we are incorporating by reference are as follows:

(a) the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016;
(b)

the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the periods ended March 31, 2017; and

(c) the description of the Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share, contained in the Registrant’s registration statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on June 7, 2013 pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act and all amendments or reports filed by us for the purpose of updating those descriptions.

All documents filed by us pursuant to Sections 13(a), 13(c), 14 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act after the initial filing date of this prospectus, through the date declared effective, until the termination of the offering of securities contemplated by this prospectus shall be deemed to be incorporated by reference into this prospectus. These documents that we file later with the Securities and Exchange Commission and that are incorporated by reference in this prospectus will automatically update information contained in this prospectus or that was previously incorporated by reference into this prospectus. You will be deemed to have notice of all information incorporated by reference in this prospectus as if that information was included in this prospectus.

We will provide to any person, including any beneficial owner, to whom this prospectus is delivered, a copy of any or all of the information that has been incorporated by reference in this prospectus but not delivered with this prospectus, at no cost to the requesting party, upon request to us in writing or by telephone using the following information:

China Commercial Credit, Inc.

No.1 Zhongying Commercial Plaza,

Zhong Ying Road,

Wujiang, Suzhou,

Jiangsu Province, China

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1,680,000 Shares of Common Stock

CHINA BAT GROUP, INC.

Prospectus Supplement

Maxim Group LLC

April 11, 2019

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Company Info:

Ticker: CCCR, Company: China Bat Group, Inc., Type: 424B5, Date: 2019-04-12CIK: 0001556266, Location: F4, SIC: 6021, SIC Desc: NATIONAL COMMERCIAL BANKS
Business Phone & Address:
ROOM 104 NO.33 SECTION D, NO.6, MIDDLE XIERQI ROAD, HAIDIAN DISTRICT
BEIJING 215200

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By | 2019-04-13T03:37:47+00:00 April 12th, 2019|Categories: CCCR, Chinese Stocks, Webplus ver|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

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